The Rise Of National Socialism Of Defying Hitler By Sebastian Haffner

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Defying Hitler is written about the rise of National Socialism within the German people during the interwar phase of Germany. Sebastian Haffner’s writes about how Nazism filled a certain empty space within the war-torn German people. Mass culture started to wash over the German people; this would start to create a society that would be built upon abstract numbers and hollow celebrations. To Haffner, the German people lived an outward existence that was deprived of any meaningful balance in a private life. The empty private lives are precisely what helped Hitler’s nationalist and Nazi propaganda to be effective in the persuasion of the German people. Defying Hitler opens during the time of the Great War. Haffner says that the true Nazi generation …show more content…
The book tells about a time when Haffner recounts a time in the Nazi camp prior to his civil service. Up until that time, Haffner had been portrayed as a middle class citizen. He had zero hints of being apart of anti-Semitism or apart of the German nationalism. After this, Haffner stopped involving himself with the Nazi Party and also with many of his friends that were within the party as well. It seemed like during this time that Haffner felt that he was above the Nazi influence during this time. Though he said at one point he was probably just as confused about himself and confused about Nazism, almost as most as Germany was at the time. Haffner would then go on to talk about his time within this “camp”, and discuss how it was a boring time for all of the men that were involved in it, but once the men were taught how to shoot guns they would get excited. Haffner questioned what the use of a rifle would be to a civil servant, but the group was just happy and relieved to be learning about something that was interesting, instead of doing the regular cleaning. The group of men would then go on to listen to speeches that Hitler had give over the radio and the group would shout “Heil Hitler” at the end of his speech. Most of the time Haffner found himself just going along with the crowd and doing all of these things in fear of embarrassment …show more content…
In a way I kind of figured that not every single German person was collaborating with the Nazi party, but I used to think that if a person lived in the country of Germany during this time, they supported the Nazi party. Hearing about Haffner’s story really opened my eyes. A lot of the German people went a long with what the Nazi party was doing, in fear that they might get killed or punished for not following in their footsteps. An example during the story is when Haffner is talking about his time in the camp. He says in the book that he would find himself just simply going along with most of the things that they did, such as shouting and saluting the flags. He did this mostly because of the fear of embarrassment or the fear of physical

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