The Rhetorical Analysis Of Othello

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Register to read the introduction… His tone is rather rash and very demeaning, especially towards his own wife, whom everybody seems to believe is innocent except him and Iago. He calls her a “strumpet” (4.2.81) and a “whore” (4.2.72). She claims ignorance and innocence, but he refuses to believe her. Even when Emilia defends her, Othello is unable to hear any voice of reason. Again, this demonstrates the inferior treatment of the women in the play. Emilia is Desdemona’s loyal servant and stays by her side through all Othello puts her through. This shows even when the women come together to speak out, their voices often remain unheard .Othello does not even take the time to listen to their reasoning, he still chooses to believe Iago over the women “Desdemona is helplessly passive. She can do nothing whatever. She cannot retaliate even in speech….She is helpless because her nature is infinitely sweet and her love absolute” (Bloom 42-43). …show more content…
He is fuming when he says, “Ay let her rot, and perish, and be damned to-night; for she shall not live” (4.1.165). He goes on to state; “I will chop her to messes. Cuckold me!” (4.1.81). He is very insulted that she would disrespect him in such a way. Othello is also concerned with others seeing his wife is not faithful to him. It makes a mockery of him and he fears it will come back on him and make him appear less of a man. Othello plans to have Cassio killed as well. He is filled with jealous rage. He feels murder to be the easiest way to seek vengeance and get rid of his competition at the same time. Likewise, Iago feels the death of Cassio would be beneficial to him as well. He says; “if Cassio do remain/ He hath a daily beauty in his life/ That makes me ugly” (5.1.18-20). He is fearful his image will be tarnished, but is also hoping to take back the position that Cassio took from

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