The Rhetorical Analysis Of Malcolm X And The Civil Rights Movement

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In 1964, the Civil Rights Acts ended segregation in American society. What would appear as a step forward in American history would soon be realized as the opposite. Black people remained victims of discrimination, oppression, degradation, and exploitation. This blatant inequality and injustice was evidence of the prejudice against Black individuals from the government and people of authority. These issues led Malcolm X to deliver the speech “The Ballot or the Bullet” in which he endorsed ethnic, monetary and social impartiality as essential to achieve their rights and freedoms, as meant to be protected through the law.

The Black community was a victim of political oppression as they were outright denied their voting
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They would put up facades for the public, creating a falsified image that would make it to seem as though they cared, when in reality they did not which allowed for "the White man" to prevail and remain at the top, with more freedom and rights than any other individual. The senators and congressmen disregard the constitutional amendments that guaranteed the general population the right to vote, through the Civil Rights Act of 1964.The speech argued that white liberals and the government had disappointed and let down Black individuals. Furthermore in Malcolm X’s oration, he stressed the necessity for Blacks to focus on themselves and not others. Malcolm X opposed boycotting and hoped to acquire a radical change in a reactionary society through the democratic procedures of voting. As a solution, Malcolm suggested …show more content…
Instilling racial pride is one of Malcolm's most noteworthy commitments to the movement. He promoted nationalism and understanding within the Black community. The Black individuals need to work together in order to achieve the freedom and rights they deserved as humans. Segregation was outlawed by the Supreme Court, which meant that anyone putting forth an effort to deprive a person of their legal rights, would be breaking the law. Instead, despite being of legal authority, the police itself was discriminating against the Black population as they humiliated and disrespected them. The police, whose intent was supposed to be to protect everyone fought against black people or would send dogs after them. That provided, Black communities standing up for what they believe in because they were within the law and their rights to do so was deemed very necessary. Moreover, Malcolm emphasized on developing the civil rights struggle to a human rights issue. This allowed the Black communities to legally portray their struggles to the United Nations for assistance in the matter. Human rights are privileges intrinsic to every single individual,without distinction as to religion, gender, nationality and etc. For example, the privilege to live free from torment and subjugation, the right to claim property, the right to equality and pride, and to live free from all types of segregation.The United

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