The Rhetorical Analysis Of Kristol And Cohen's Speech

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Register to read the introduction… Kristol and Cohen begin by informing their audience of the recent developments of cloning human embryos. They have to assume that their audience is not up-to-date with all the information, so their first step is to inform the audience. The story they begin with about Dr. West gradually brings in the reader. Instead of stating facts and immediately boring the audience, the story is a way for the authors to catch their audience’s attention. Unlike Ron Reagan’s speech, their audience could easily just flip the page and go on to read another article; they have to captivate their audience as soon as possible. Their tone is the antithesis of Ron Reagan Jr.’s, and they definitely begin strongly. The essay’s tone is more aggressive-persuasive. Instead of concentrating on the emotional sides of the audience, the piece concentrates more on the ethics of the issue. The authors completely disregard pathos. However, the complete disregard of pathos appeal could have its downfall. Sometimes emotions are the tactics which connect the audience to the writing. When emotions are disregarded, the audience could feel disconnected from the authors and the message they are trying to convey. But too much of anything could also be a problem. If the writing is filled with a lot of …show more content…
“Should Human Cloning Be Allowed? No it’s a Moral Monstrosity.” In Dynamic Argument. Ed. Robert Lamm and Justin Everett. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2007. 425-26.

Hirsen, James L. “Who’s the Victor on the Stem Cell Debate?” 7 Aug. 2001. 24 Sept. 2007 < http://www.firstliberties.com/stem_cell_debate.html>.

“How to Write a Rhetorical Analysis.” 5 Aug. 2005. 23 Sept. 2007 .

Lamm, Robert, and Justin Everett. Dynamic Argument. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2007.

Postrel, Virginia. “Should Human Cloning Be Allowed? Yes, Don’t Impede Medical Progress.” In Dynamic Argument. Ed. Robert Lamm and Justin Everett. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2007. 420-23.

Reagan, Ron Jr. “Remarks by Ron Reagan, Jr., to the 2004 Democratic National Convention.” In Dynamic Argument. Ed Robert Lamm and Justin Everett. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2007.

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