Continental Congress's Decision To Revise The Constitution

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In this document, James Madison explains the reasoning of the Continental Congress’s decision to revise the Articles of Confederation. Many events such as national bankruptcy, tension with the British and problems in Massachusetts occurred and showcased the weaknesses of the current Articles. Madison is quick to proclaim the futility of those Articles unless a provision is placed on them. A solution which various leaders, including Madison, supported was the idea of a centralized government rather than the separate ones in each state.

The significance of the document is the information that James Madison supplies on the reasoning of the decision to make the Constitution. Madison was the chief recorder of information and a representative
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Due to Congress having too much power over state laws and small states having less say in the national government compared to larger states, the Virginia Plan faced rejection. The New Jersey Plan didn’t fare well either so a compromise to incorporate both portions of each proposal is created.

Butler’s document demonstrates the views of federalists and anti-federalist which is significant. Picks up laws and regulations from both sides to reach an accord in which both sides have a say and can agree on them. Many important decisions relating to representatives and state legislature were solved within the convention. The document shows that the delegates were making progress into finalizing a compromise that would work for the people.

In his letter, Elbridge states his reason for not signing the Constitution. He thinks the Constitution doesn’t meet the people’s needs and fears that it may be too vague. He reason the need for a Bill of Rights,which would prevent local laws from state to state to change, would help balance the equality of all states. Nevertheless, Gerry thinks the document has prospect, but only if a few improvements are made to

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