The Rhetoric Of Anorexia Nervosa

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Anorexia nervosa, a common eating disorder, mostly is triggered by personal request of losing weight or decreasing ingestion. Interestingly, historical accounts stand in direct opposition to what Malson (1998) describes as the rhetoric of anorexia as a modern disease, which is propped up by the popular discourse of thinness and the media. Furthermore, the recent and copious emergence of literature documenting historical cases of anorexia (Bemporad, 1996) may be indicative of a discursive shift away from this hitherto popular view (Spedding, 2013). However, anorexia nervosa now has become a popular eating disorder discussed both in physiological and psychological field. The idea that anorexia nervosa is primarily a nervous system disorder stem …show more content…
Here are the proposed criteria for anorexia nervosa. At first, behavior that induces lack of report ductile health is interpreted unequally according to gender can be illustrated by the following exercise. Then, restriction of food intake relative to caloric requirements leading to the maintenance of a body weight less than a minimally normal weight for age and height, hence the intense fear of gaining weight or becoming fat, even though underweight, or persistent behavior to avoid gain, even though underweight. The last one is that disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight or shape on self-evaluation, or persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight (Spedding, 2013). These reasons sufficiently reveal that how people feel stress in their weight because of the pressure from social and cultural …show more content…
A consistent theme to emerge was that anorexia at first provides a sense of control and identity (Recovering patients, 2011). Patients are feel comfortable at first because they satisfies with the immediate results from decreasing ingestion. Therefore, they tell themselves if they eat less they will see some more dramatic result exposed in a short time. After having a long time mismatch signal for their bodies, they feel like even though they feel really hungry, their bodies misunderstand the hungry signal from brain and don’t response to the signal any more. Some symptoms occur when people are suffering an anorexia nervosa. People are usually young, becomes obsessed with their body weight, and become extremely thin---- generally by eating very little and sometimes also by regurgitating food, taking laxatives, over-exercising, or drink large amounts of water to suppress appetite (Breedlove & Watson, 2013). They quickly lose weight and lack of

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