The Revolution: Is It Constitutional?

Great Essays
ren Hanscom
American History
The Revolution: Is it Constitutional? How can it be that a government that a people have wanted for a long time, be one of the factors to splitting that very same people apart? Freedom and Sovereignty were the major ideals for the revolutionists in 1754-1803. In 1789, these ideals were met as the government they so longed for had arrived, the American Constitution. Many times throughout the late 17th century, it was shone that this government was able to line up with the revolutionary ideals of freedom and sovereignty, through events such as Britain’s Salutary Neglect, British Acts, and Shay’s Rebellion early on. Once the Constitution was actually drafted, this was not the case as shown through the battle between
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After British salutary neglect, they realized the American push for independence and decided to take action. Many acts were put upon the Americans such as the Stamp Act which was a direct tax on most tangible objects. The Americans were outraged by this tax because it was a direct tax on purchased goods and it was a drain that snatched away money from their wallets. They thought that the British expansion of power was too much and it needed to stop. Not only the Stamp Act, but the Intolerable Acts which were labeled punitive in direct correlation to the Boston Tea Party. These were harsh acts by the British who were basically putting the Americans in check as they knew they were in control at that time. The American pushed for some sort of sovereignty and weren’t going to stop fighting until their rights were met. Through the three branch system (judicial, legislative, and executive) created in the constitution, power is distributed among the people as each branch is able to check the other one. It was realized that the Executive Branch had too much power so this system originated to stop the tyranny of a certain people. Towards the end of his career, Washington got on the bad side of the ideals as he pushed his power to the …show more content…
When George Washington selected these two gentlemen as cabinet members, he saw the diverse beliefs among the two officers and thought that by electing them, there would be a more diverse opinion for decisions he had to make. His selections ended up causing a breakdown in the Constitution because of how each viewed it. Hamilton, who was a business man and believed that the future of America lay in the hands of the wealthy, interpreted the Constitution loosely, trying to expand the power of his wealthy supporters and businesses. Jefferson, who saw future America as middle class workers and farmers, looked at the Constitution strictly because he saw the power balance hidden among the words of the Constitution. These ideas which are part of the revolution, obviously did not line up well with the Constitution because it couldn’t meet the ideals of both people and the creator of the document didn’t expect a two party system to happen. When John Adams (supporter of Hamilton’s Ideas) and Jefferson become President and Vice President, the Constitution broke down even more because it didn’t anticipate a contested election with two different political parties (federalist vs Anti-federalist) at the head of the White House. Again, as a result, the ideals of both revolutionists’ sides didn’t lineup with the

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