The Republic Of Yemen's Low Income Economy

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Located on the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula, just below wealthy Saudi Arabia, the Republic of Yemen was formed after the breakup of the Ottoman Empire after World War I. By World Bank standards, it is still considered a developing country, meaning compared to other countries, it has a low Human Development Index score; its government is often referred to as a “kleptocracy,” or a government that takes advantage of systemic corruption to extend their own personal wealth and political power. Yemen’s low income economy has a GDP of 34.93 billion USD, as of 2015, and it faces difficult long-term challenges for stabilization and growth. The current, ongoing civil war between opposing regimes has halted Yemen’s exports, pressured the currency’s …show more content…
None of the working women with less than a primary education are salaried workers; roughly three-quarters of working women are self-employed. Among women completing secondary or higher schooling, 84% are salaried workers. Salaried work is more common for women in small towns than in urban areas. Nearly half of women are self-employed and live in small villages and rural areas. Women are also more likely than men to work in the public sector: 43% of employed women work either in government or in government-owned corporations, compared to 33% of men. Men are nearly twice as likely as women to work for a private household. Among women, public sector employment increases with education. For those with less than a primary education, there are few opportunities in the public sector, but 73% of working women with secondary or more schooling hold such positions. Perhaps the strongest indicator, other than level of education, as to whether a woman would work in the public sector instead of a private sector position, is the density of the population in which she lives: 76% of women in small towns and large villages work in the public sector, compared to either 40% in more urban, and 33% in more rural, communities. Public sector work for women in Yemen might also relate to higher household incomes along with higher levels of education: roughly two-thirds of employed women living in …show more content…
In the SWMENA survey, monthly earnings were collected using intervals and concluded that 43% of working women, but only 14% of working men, earns less than 20,000 rials per month. Actually, working women earn an average of 28,948 rials per month, compared with 42,475 rials earned by men during the same time period. These figures suggest that women earn 68% as much as men do, which would equate to a gender gap of 32%. However, the study does note that differences in hours worked and type of work have not been taken into account. Interestingly, earnings do not increase steadily with more schooling. Women without education are twice as likely to earn less than 20,000 rials per month as women with a secondary degree or more, and furthermore, women in small towns and large villages appear to have higher earnings than those in either urban or rural areas. The study also shows that education increases women’s role in household decision-making by nearly two-fold; education also increases the proportion of women who report deciding on house purchases with their husbands, therefore exhibiting a larger practice of freedom (Focus on Yemen | Paid

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