The Renaissance: Medical Practices During The Renaissance

1132 Words 5 Pages
Does life without medicine in today’s society, even seem possible? It doesn’t seem possible, but in 1350’s to the 1550’s in Europe diseases, and many other medical problems ravaged the people. This period of time is called the Renaissance or what others called the “re-birth”. It was during this time that cities in Europe just recently recovered from the Black Plague and were just starting to rebuild and regain the strength in their country. In addition to rebuilding their city, there was also major progress of all sorts of medical knowledge. This was all possible by different technological advances, continued learning of the human body and other things, and last but not least accidental discoveries. During the Renaissance medical practices …show more content…
About half of all children in Europe during this time died before the age of ten. Some examples of childhood illnesses were smallpox, measles, influenza, whooping cough, infantile diarrheas, tuberculosis, typhus, worm infestations, eye infections, injuries that crippled/severely impaired them. A few factors that caused some of these were the children’s diet and what they ate, how and where they lived, the breakouts of war, and many other factors in society (Sirasi). Some non-human vectors that brought sickness to some, were mosquitos infected people with Malaria, ticks infected people with Lyme disease, fleas, and …show more content…
Some of those people were Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), William Harvey (1578-1657), Leonardo Da Vinci (1452-1519). Andreas Vesalius was a Flemish anatomis, Physician, and the author of one of the most influential books on human anatomy “De Humani Corporis Fabrica libri septem” or known as “On the Fabric of the Human Body in seven books”. The first book in the series was called The Bones and Cartilages, which constitutes about a quarter of the entire collection of books about the human anatomy. In this book he wrote about his observations on the bones and cartilage of the human body, of which he collected for cemeteries. It covers the physical appearance of the bones and the differentiation of human bones and cartilage by function. Within each of the chapters Vesalius describes the bones in great detail, and explains their physical qualities in different ways. The second book in the series is called The Ligaments and Muscles; in this he describes the structure of the muscles, the agents used in creating movement of the body, and the material used to hold joints together. Through his observations of butchers cutting meat, he was able to incorporate those skills in order to be able to dissect a human body. The illustrations within the book show the order in which to dissect a human body, allowing someone to be able to effectively observe each muscle contained

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