How Did Hitler's Remilitarization Of The Rhineland?

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The remilitarization of the Rhineland and the invasion of Czechoslovakia were both significant events that bolstered Hitler’s control over the German army; however, the former was more fundamental to the establishment of Hitler’s control of the German military. The German forces had not seen the Rhineland since the Treaty of Versailles had been established, which had no influence of German diplomats to agree to the terms. This event was so significant because it altered the balance of power in Europe allowing Germany to lead an administration of aggression, meaning they were able to attack other nations without the fear of repercussions. This allowed Hitler to strike Western Europe, specifically France, with much ease without any intervention from other nations. The occupation of Czechoslovakia was less crucial to Hitler’s plan because his remilitarization of the Rhineland had already …show more content…
The announcement of the remilitarization of the Rhineland to the German people caused tremendous joy and nationalism throughout the nation gaining Hitler complete support. Hitler’s military commanders initially advised against the remilitarization, but news of the successful operation gained Hitler more respect within the military. With complete support of the German people and army Hitler’s confidence rose and so did his control over the army.

When Hitler remilitarized the Rhineland, in 1936, this marked his first act of aggression. "To the question that naturally arises, of whether Hitler might have been deterred had he known in advance that he would be met with serious military resistance, the answer is that this might have been so because we know now how strongly the German generals were opposed to sending troops into the Rhineland to face a risk of this kind. The rebuilding of the German army was still at

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