The Relationship Between Humans And Mother Nature

1447 Words 6 Pages
Some might say a child expects its mother to give and mother expects its child to take. In similar ways we, humans, being the child of the earth take from the world and expect Mother Nature just to give. However, human mothers and physical mothers are finite resources and their children must be cognizant of this fact before it is too late. This relationship between a child and its mother demonstrates how the relationship between the human and non-human world is a selfish one. However, recent shift in attitude have led to efforts to conserve and give back to nature instead of abusing it. Humans through the use of technology are curbing the negative effects humanity is having on the Mother Nature by creating and utilizing electric cars, solar …show more content…
With advances in science and the invention of machinery, the Industrial Revolution marked an era in which humans had the capacity to destroy nature. To run the factories of the north, nonrenewable resources had to be extracted from remote areas. This extraction did not only disrupt plant and animal life in those particular environments, but it also resulted in the burning of fossil fuels and releasing of pollutants in the air. Smog and soot roamed the cities and eventually made it into the upper atmosphere where it striped electrons from the ozone layer and accelerated the global warming process. This polluting behavior and disregard for nature became a habit that humanity had adopted until recent years. For example, in Annie Leonard’s “The Story of bottled Water: A Footnoted and Annotated Script” she states “Eighty percent [of bottles] end up in landfills, where they will sit for thousands of years, or in incinerators, where they are burned, releasing toxic pollution” (201). And of those twenty percent of bottles that are recycled, most were thrown away and shipped to India “just to be dumped in someone else’s backyard” (Leonard 202). However, this is not the only pollution created by water bottles, the production process is also responsible emitting tons of pollutants in the air and in the surrounding environments. Leonard informs the reader that “the problem …show more content…
Our relationship with nature has shifted from a selfish one to a more selfless/symbiotic/caring one. For example, in 1973 Congress passed the Endangered Species Act to protect all non-pest species (Nijhuis 565). Some individuals even practiced the Noah Principle which stated “all species are fundamentally equal, and everything can and should be saved, regardless of its importance to humans” (Nijhuis 565). However, as per usually, money dictates most conservation efforts and as budgets shrink “politicians and regulators increasingly favor helping the economy over helping the planet” (Nijhuis 565). However, this reality did not and has not stop environmentalist. They have created systems and programs using technology to save as many species possible around the world. Some scientists use the triage system to prioritize different species based on a variety of factors while others use the triage approach to select different ecosystems. To maximize the triage system, Nijhuis in “Which Species Will Live?” describes how a group of scientist developed a software program called Marxan that “aims to maximize the effectiveness of conservation reserves by considering not only the presence of endemic species and the level of conservation threats but also factors such as the cost of protection and ‘complementarity’—the contribution of each new reserve to

Related Documents