The Relationship Between Gods And Mortals In Archaic Greece

1820 Words 8 Pages
Religion and relationships between Gods and mortals in Archaic Greece is often a central focus to scholars studying the period. This is due to the popularity surrounding early Greek poetry through the extraordinary images of iconic Greek Gods and Goddesses, and how these figures are dominant in the lives of Greek people during the Archaic period. In terms of early Greek poetry, Homer’s Odyssey and the Iliad, along with Hesiod’s Theogony tend to be the most popular and useful in studying both the relationships of Gods and mortals as well as Archaic religion. “The Olympians are a group of 12 Gods who ruled after the overthrow of the Titans”. Define who the Greek gods were and what their position in an Archaic society was. In terms of the Archaic …show more content…
Modern scholars tackle this subject through the analysis of not just the early Greek poems themselves, but include the study of wider evidence such as architecture/ archaeological evidence, fine arts, including; vases, cups and craters, along with the inclusion of Greek god statues. Modern scholars such as, ‘Jon D. Mikalson’, ‘M.I Finely’, Louise Bruit Zaidman’ and Pauline Schmitt Pantel’ have various arguments mainly structured around how the Gods had influence on the mortals daily and religious life, and how the effect of these early Greek poems, “were deeply enshrined in the minds of Greeks”. This essay will entail the key relationships between Gods and mortals in early Greek poetry and how this truly effected the lives of the Greeks, along with analysis of how these poems can help contemporaries understand Archaic beliefs through imagery presented in not only poetry but wider forms of evidence; For example Greek architecture and fine …show more content…
Female Goddesses, such as Calypso tended to dominate male mortals, depicted in, “you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, and let me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see this wife of yours”. Clearly foreshadows the prodigious amount of control Calypso has over Odysseus subverting the typical patriarchal society where “men had the dominant role in public life”. Calypso kidnaps and “her powers of seduction were enough to keep Odysseus on her island and away from his home for seven years. Giving us the picture that relationships between male mortals and Goddesses usually involved females as the superiors and tempting to married mortals. Modern translations of the Odyssey, book 5 show how Odysseus fell into Calypso’s alluring ploy by committing an act of adultery in “the two of them found the deepest recess of the hollow cave, and delighted together in their lovemaking”. Displaying the ideology that early Greek poetry creates the picture that a relationship between a God and mortal outplays any ‘loyal’ marriage between two mortals. These poems create the image that Gods and Goddesses were viewed as the “blessed ones”. So despite the Greek Gods violent behaviour, the mortals still craved a relationship with

Related Documents