The Reforms Of Alexander II And Peter I Of Russia

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In 1682 Peter I of Russia would ascend to the throne of Russia and over the course of his tenure in office execute a series of reforms, that would drastically change the administrative State that had previously existed throughout the empire. In 1855 a distant heir, Alexander II would ascend to the throne and in the footsteps of his predecessor, and in a similar manner, execute similar reforms. Both propelled using European models, both the reforms of Peter and those of Alexander sought to revitalize Russia, in order to make the Empire more successful against European powers. One would succeed and usher in a period of administrative prosperity, that would properly unite Russia under a central authority, the other would result in Russia’s internal …show more content…
This included ensuring that the public of Russia was educated, in order to ensure the success of the State , from the top to the bottom. In line with Peter’s fascination with the West, he recognized the importance of establishing and uplifting an informed populace. In 1710 the literacy rate of Russia was estimated to be 2.8%. To Peter, an uninformed populace equaled a state that was not self-sustaining. Being a promoter a Polzeistaat structure, which relied on a state supporting policies which engineered state interest, he used the State to engineer multiple educational institutions: The School of Navigation and Maths in 1701, The School of Medicine in 1707, The School of Engineering in 1712, and the School of Science in 1724. Peter’s administrative reforms were focused on bringing Russia up to Western standard and out of a “primitive era”, understanding that this required the restructuring of every part of the Russian Empire that the administrative government could control, and give the administrative government control of even more parts of the State …show more content…
Unlike Peter, Alexander’s reforms were not well structured or based on a platform for all-encompassing State improvement,rather instead were the result of retaliation to negative occurrences. The catalyst that began these reforms itself, was the result of Russia being proven inferior on the global scale, once again. Following their defeat in the Crimean War Russia was forced to once again compare itself to Western societies, under similar motives as Peter the Great: the anticipation that by correctly what was wrong with Russia based on an implementing a Western model of administration, they would produce a more effective administration. In its evaluation of the Russian model, Alexander attributed much of the military’s failure to the continuation of Serfdom, which limited the amount of individuals that could be conscripted, to effectively build the Russian army. Thus, in a step toward resolution , he passed a reform which Emancipated the Serfs on February 19, 1861, initiating the start of the Great Reforms under his

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