Essay On Church Reformation

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Reformation can be defined as a process that begun in early 16th century to revolutionaize and change the traditional systems of the roman catholic church. These changes were initiated by a group of leaders who saw a need to make amendments within the church in accordance to the gospel in the bible. Other reforms had been advocated before these times but were never successful as the church had a strong command over its following and the political class. However, the 16th century enabled the radical changing of church traditions by scholars and leaders who managed to expresss their view with great conviction to the masses and political leaders through indepth analysis of the bible through published pamphlets and other journals.
The reformation
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These were church that preached and practiced certain rituals and practices differently from the traditional catholic church. Self belief and salvation of one’s own soul was more important in this new dimension of Christianity. Traditionally, the papacy and the catholic leadership of priests and canons had a significant role in people lives and even in the [political leadership of countries. As a result the powerful stature and wealth of the church caltivated corruption of doctrines and practices of the church. Protestants wanted to establish their own churches free from the corruption that wasevident in the roman …show more content…
His publication of the 95 theses begun the reformation in the early 16th century and over the next few years he was the most vocal leader of the protestant reformation. He is recorded in history books and online journals as the main leader of protestant reformation.” no reformer was more adept than martin luther at using the power of the press to spread his ideas. Between 1518 and 1525, luther published more works than the next 17 m,ost prolific reformers combined.”his protestant churches called Lutherans are still active even to date and his practices are literally spread through out the protestant Christian fraternity across the

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