The Reflection Of Focusing On The Music Of Beethoven

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It was not too long ago that I started listening to the music of Beethoven out of interest. I had always dreamed of organizing my own symphony, making each and every piece with the technical mastery of that of the most incredible composers like him. When it came to portraying serious emotions such as anger, frustration or even sorrow; few could contest Beethoven. For this assignment, I decided to go with one of my favourite pieces of his: Symphony No. 7. Focusing on the second movement, before even getting halfway through, I began to picture what felt to me as an organized take-over of sorts. The kind employed by a group of people wanting to undermine a higher power to establish what they think is a better place, under a greater leadership. …show more content…
To me, this is made apparent by the dynamics displayed in the first third of the movement that I alluded to earlier; a crescendo. The full orchestra of instruments accompany the aforementioned melody of violins to show what I can only describe as the ‘thickening of the plot’. Then finally, the first part of the movement concludes with a very brief decrescendo that ends that homophony of music. The second part of the movement doesn’t contain the motive I have discussed earlier that is quite dominant in the first part, but instead moves to a more peaceful sounding melody. What this made me think of was that the initial fighting was over and that the leading power was overthrown in some way by the rebels. They could then begin to change the system to what is wanted by those in charge of the revolt. In my opinion, the peaceful sounding second part is indicative of a peaceful resolve, not a malicious one thus resulting in celebrations by the people involved. There are many reasons for why the second part makes me feel this way, but most notable to me is that there is less aggression being …show more content…
His expression of various emotions up until then had yet to contain what George Grove referred to as “moods and manners” (Grove, 1896). The seventh symphony was a challenge he set forth to accomplish that introduced a more upbeat, lively vibe to his music that he hadn’t demonstrated before. The reactions to the piece when first presented to an audience were terrific. It gave off a very grand feeling unlike any other. As detailed by Grove, there is a chord being played just as I expected. Specifically, in the A key (Grove, 1896). The middle section is indeed played on the flute which is said to add to a “romantic” feeling with “swift and unexpected changes and contrasts, exciting the imagination to the highest degree” (Grove, 1896). I would believe this is most prominently shown during the transition between the first and second parts as I mentioned earlier. Another similarity to what I thought and what is also described by Grover is that there is a change from loud to soft in volume (Grove, 1896). David Lidov indicates that this piece is in fact in the ternary form as I had thought, while also mentioning that the piece is played with the allegretto

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