A Horseman In The Sky Analysis

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Imagine your fifteen year old son going to war, uncertain if he will ever return home again. Growing old is something that should be cherished, not catalyzed. Whether it is committing murder, witnessing death, or being a part of a destructive brotherhood, war has detrimental effects of the lives of all soldiers. All of these aspects of war lead an individual to not only fight for their own life, but to fight for the rights of others as well. The loss of innocence in the Civil War forces young soldiers to welcome adulthood in the face of adversity and chaos in a dwindling nation. As demonstrated by a variety of pieces of expressive art, such as The Red Badge of Courage and “A Horseman in the Sky”, destroyed innocence is portrayed as a result …show more content…
In “A Horseman in the Sky”, traditional morality is severely destroyed by the war. Carter Druse, a Virginian teenager, objects to his family’s beliefs and joins the Union Army. Throughout the story, feelings of insanity about patriotic duty and family obedience overflow his mind. Holding nothing back in battle, Druse has no choice but to fire towards the enemy, tragically striking his father, who is a Confederate spy. In this example, Bierce highlights the destructive impact war has on families no matter where they fight or who they fight for. He suggests that no single nation is so corrupt on its own, but it is the country’s men who make it a “theater of war” (Bierce). Many soldiers go to extreme lengths in order show their support for war even if it costs their lives. Murder is the only solution for justice in a world where voices are not heard. Likewise, In the Red Badge of Courage, Henry enlists in the Confederate military against his family’s wishes to support a cause he believes is worth fighting for. He believes a false reality about war and courage, and yearns for a red badge of courage or a symbol of heroism that he could show off with pride. During battle, he succumbs to fear, runs away from the scene with a sense of cowardice, and contemplates the truth of war. Henry is shocked by the true brutality of the war as an “onslaught of redoubtable dragons” (Crane 36). Henry views …show more content…
In these several of pieces expressive art, the loss of innocence in the Civil War is demonstrated through a series of elements. Noone is prepared to commit murder, especially the youth in war, who are full of such severed enthusiasm. Witnessing murder has lasting-effects on anyone no matter where they originate. Too, a distraught brotherhood is formed during all the chaos of war. Though some could argue that experiencing war creates strength in character, ultimately their loss of innocence causes long term damage to their psyche. In conclusion, innocence should always be a given, not a

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