Causes Of The Protestant Reformation

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The Protestant Reformation of the 1600’s was a major turning point in history that shaped our faith and theology. By the 1600’s the Catholic Church had become the wealthiest and most powerful empires in all of Europe. Ironically enough one of the reasons of the reformation was how this Roman Empire raised money to secure is position of power. In addition the Catholic Church owned large parcels of land about one third of Europe. There were many leaders instrumental to this protestant revolution such as Martin Luther, John Calvin and King Henry VIII. The Reformation was an ultimate shift away from abuses of the Catholic Church. After much time of being in power, corruption had seeped through its priesthood and the once important guidance of …show more content…
The Roman Catholic Church would only print bibles in Latin meaning only educated people could read and interpret them. While seeking asylum Luther would translate the bible into German language that anyone could read. He was the first person to use the modern technology of the day to advance the cause for Christian faith. He used the newly developed printing press to make mass copies of the bible and theological literature. A documentary done my A&E stated “No reformer was more adept than Martin Luther at using the power of the press to spread his ideas. Between 1518 and 1525, Luther published more works than the next 17 most prolific reformers combined.”(The Reformation.” 2012. The History Channel) The fact that Luther could get his message of truth and new teachings in to the hands of thousands allowing him to make this transition shift possible. The reformation brought change in theological truths as creeds that we read today such as the apostles creed. His theology of authority of scripture for all believers was in hopes that everyone would see the real truth and return to a true knowledge of Christ and salvation. Luther risked his life for biblical truth in the face of an empire of corruption and help advanced a new era in …show more content…
He had a determined split from the Roman Catholic Church hugely shifting the source of power in 16th Century Europe. While his motive of the split for political and personal he still opened the doors to expand the reformation. He took power from the Catholic Church by shutting down their operations and repossessing their land. Once he took power of the country’s religion he instated himself as the head of the church. One overlying theme through the spreading of the reformation is the personal sacrifice one ones life for the sake of the true gospel to be taught and spread. In 1558 there was a turn back to Catholic teachings, those who refused lost their church. Members such as Cranmer and Latimer along with hundreds of others were martyred for their faith. However, Cairns stated, “ Nothing strengthened the cause of protectants more then the death of martyrs. (Cairns, 325) If not for Personal interests of the king and the martyrs’ who would not back down for the sake of the gospel England would not have seen the reformation ad well as those who she influenced. With the entire nation of England’s departure from the control of the Pope and the rest of the Catholic Church, the power held by Rome depleted. Not only had they lost control of a key part of Europe, but also other countries laid witness to such a departure, as well as the results, and thus were

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