The Reasons Of The Indian Removal Act Of 1830

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The Indian Removal Act of 1830 resulted in the forced removal of the Cherokee, Seminole, Choctaw, Creek and Chickasaw tribes from their homelands in Mississippi, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Alabama to western land. Colonists had been wanting the land held by the Native Americans for a long time, and when Andrew Jackson came into the presidency, he made their dream of owning it a reality – at the expense of the Native Americans. The Indian Removal Act should never have passed, as it was problematic morally, politically and practically. Politically, the act was unconstitutional, and allowing it 's passage would be illegal; it would result in the death of thousands of Native Americans, making it morally reprehensible; and wouldn 't actually …show more content…
At best, the act was a temporary and brutal solution to a symptom of the root problems – it was ostensibly meant to address the threat of conflict between settlers and 'protect ' Native Americans by sending them to the unsettled western territory. James Monroe discusses some of the motives behind the removal of the Native Americans in a speech to Congress in 1825. He explains that if they aren 't moved, then they will inevitably be 'degraded and exterminated ', and so forcing them west would be in their best interest. It makes sense that the then-president of the United States would say this – if Natives were removed from their land, then US citizens could move into it, and the US could generate revenue from their profits. Meanwhile, profits made by Native Americans were kept entirely to themselves, since they were technically an independent nation. Monroe 's defense of the Act was not only a cover for his real motives, but an outright lie. In actuality, this plan was the opposite of protection, and would only displace and endanger the Native Americans who weren 't killed during the long journey west. Furthermore, displacement wouldn 't …show more content…
As more and more white settlers began moving westward, conflict between whites and natives became an issue again. In a move that surprised no one, the US government again sided with the white settlers. A series of acts were enforced in the years between 1851 and 1889, collectively entitled 'Indian Appropriation Act '. These acts would yet again uproot entire tribes, often forcing them onto marked reservations that continue to exist today. The act utilized the guise of the earlier Indian Removal Act – it claimed to 'protect ' Native Americans from western-settling whites. Again, the acts were politically, morally and practically unwise, and natives and some whites protested; and again, the government forced Native Americans off land that rightfully belonged to

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