The Real Monster In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Marry Shelley has had a great influence on countless authors, thanks to her novel Frankenstein.

Published in 1818, Frankenstein is a celebrated classic about a scientist who loses everything. Set in

Europe, in the 18th century,Victor Frankenstein is determined to create a new race of super humans. He

creates a creature and immediately rejects his creation. The creature sets out to make his creator 's life

miserable, and destroy all those he loves. Frankenstein makes countless mistakes that lead to

repercussions, and terrible sorrow. In all the awful deeds the creature does, there is one person who is

to blame, Victor Frankenstein. A question rises in the book; who is the real monster? The creature is

the one performing the atrocities,
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Mind you this woman was fairly close to Victor, she was a servant from his house. The fact

that he would stand by and allow this poor woman to be killed, shows that he has monstrous qualities.

There is another way in which all of this death, pain, and loss could have been prevented.

Near the conclusion of the book, Victor states why he did not share about the monster. “I could not

bring myself to disclose a secret which would fill my hearer with consternation, and make fear and

unnatural horror the inmates of his breast.” This explanation is a bit hard to accept. When people are

dying and you have no control over the situation, you have to seek help. Victor failed to see this and as

a result, a lot of innocent people died. He had all the opportunities in the world to tell his father, or a

friend about the creature. If Victor had just confided in his loved ones, things would have been

different. With support, advice and joint efforts to stop the creature, lives would surely have been

saved. This goes back to Victor 's fear, and him allowing that fear to affect the lives of others. Victor

should have understood that he is to blame for all the murders. Therefore, he should be using all
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Victor constantly puts his own worries above the sake of others.

Frankenstein is a tragic book, there is no denying that. A young scientist burning with enthusiasm

for his field. He crosses the line in his desire to play God, and suffers the consequences. The creature

was never given a fair chance, thanks to the monster who made him. All of the sorrow is a result of a

man 's utter inability to take responsibility for his own mess. Shelley attempts to shed light on a number

of topics. To name a few: the dangers of obsession, man should not play God, even the slow fade from

man to monster. Shelley is very potent on the topics she writes about, she gets her messages across loud

and clear. A particular question about the book, who is the real monster? Is it the creature who goes

around and kills many people? Or is it Victor Frankenstein? The man who created the beast, and

neglected every chance he had to make things right. This creature is hideous to look at and commits

awful murders. One might describe him as a monster! However, reading the book a message from

Shelley seems very clear. The monster is not the monster, the monster is the

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