The Raven Essay

2096 Words 9 Pages
How is The Raven still so popular today? Over 150 years after its publication, The Raven is known by nearly every living soul today. Just saying the word “Nevermore” will immediately instate the thought of the poem in your mind. While there is no way to truly know how the poem has retained its popularity, it is possible to analysis what parts are the favorite of now and in the past. Poe is the embodiment of eerie and terrifying poetry, but beyond this, symbolism played an incredibly influential part in his poems. Specifically, The Raven is named after a symbol that Poe used so elegantly and it is partially responsible why he is still so well known today. You can either spend hours analyzing the poem or you can skim it over and still enjoy …show more content…
We can assume that this is his wife, even though it is not given directly, based on the way he speaks of her and we will refer to her as such from her on. A raven comes and the man proceeds to ask the raven several questions about Lenore. The poem begins famously with the line “Once upon a midnight dreary…”(“The Raven” 1) followed by the man that narrates and is the main character in the story speaking of his environment. He is in a room with “…quaint and curious volumes of forgotten lore…”(“The Raven” 2) then he hears a rapping at his door. This completes the introductory stanza, but it introduces the dark ominousness of the poem, making it so vital to the structure. The midnight dreary line is incredibly well known; however, it possibly has more meaning than what it portrays. The midnight is an end to something, which by itself is fairly obvious and uninteresting, but it is mentioned at the first line of the next stanza that it is also December. And even so it might not mean much, but with the theme of death and sorrow in the poem, it shows that it may have some significance. They are both the end of something and with the theme of death; it is possible it speaks of how death is the end of all. It could also be the end of suffering or sadness, either by death or just becoming happy again and …show more content…
He whispers Lenore into the night, with only the echo returning. After that, he hears a tapping at his window and he opens it up. In steps the raven, the key token of symbolism in the story. Described as stately, implying he entered majestically or great, as if the bird is of a higher stature than just a bird. And the following words: “…of the saintly days of yore” (“The Raven” 38), could just be referring to that they were popular in the older times, but we can possibly stretch it to say that he refers to the days of yore fondly, again because of Lenore. At the end of the stanza, the narrator also states another major piece of symbolism in the poem: the bust of Pallas. Pallas, being the Greek goddess of wisdom(), implies again that there is more to the raven that is presented at this time in the poem. The man disregards the raven’s words, just phrases learned by a master, but with this we know that its words are calculated and meaningful. The man is beguiled to smile at the raven meaning he was deceived into a smile, by the grave and stern look it wore. It’s possible that his mood was so dreadful that he thought that the raven’s look to be so perfectly fitting his mood that he

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