Essay On Into The Wild, By Jon Krakauer

1333 Words 6 Pages
The world puts pressure on individuals by setting high societal standards one must achieve in order to be considered successful in life. Family also plays a significant role in one’s life, as parents expect their children to succeed and follow specific paths in life. However, young adults often feel burdened by the need of having to meet the expectations of both family and society; leading many individuals to develop high levels of stress. In Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild both Chris McCandless and Jon Krakauer must deal with the high expectations of their father, eventually coming to view life on the road as a way to relieve their burdens. Chris McCandless sets off to Alaska in hopes to start a new life, while Jon Krakauer climbs the mountain, …show more content…
First of all, some people believe life on the road has the disadvantage of isolating individuals from their family and society, however, it actually helps one develop the ability to understand their wants and needs. Our family is often the place people turn to for comfort, and despite the many differences that can exist within a family; it holds a special place in many hearts. Society also has the ability to build connections between individuals, allowing them to search for comfort in others when they are unable to turn to their families. In Into the Wild Jon Krakauer writes about his own experience as a lone traveler. Krakauer’s purpose for climbing the Devils Thumb was to make a difference in his routine lifestyle, which consisted of a low paying job, and to prove to his father that his challenge was not to become a doctor, but rather to climb a mountain. He hoped that by climbing the Devils Thumb, would prove how successful he is despite not meeting his father's expectations of becoming a doctor. Nevertheless, his efforts of climbing the mountain led to isolation. He writes, …show more content…
It is a great stress reliever and a fantastic way to find oneself. In Jon Krakauer’s Into the Wild, he writes about the journey and death of Chris McCandless in Alaska. On the way to Alaska, McCandless occasionally returns to society in order to hitch a ride to specific locations. One of the individuals that offered him a ride was Ronald Franz, an eighty-one year old that formed a special bond with McCandless. When McCandless finally embarks on his journey to Alaska, he writes a letter to Franz in hopes of encouraging him to start his own life on the road, he writes “You will see things and meet people and there is much to learn from them… I hope that the next time I see you, you will be a new man with a vast array of new adventure and experiences behind you… Just get out and do it. You will be very, very glad you did,” (58). Ronald Franz had a depressing background, which consisted of losing his wife and son to a car accident when he was fighting in the Vietnam War. Franz cared for McCandless as his own grandson, and took his advice into consideration in hopes of finding a happier life. McCandless’s advice applies to everyone, as he writes about benefits of life on the road. Life on the road can help people learn about the world through encounters with others throughout the journey. These travels offer new experiences and do not have to consist of abandoning one’s life altogether. These experiences can be found

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