The Purpose Of Dreams In Sigmund Freud's On Dreams

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In Sigmund Freud’s piece, On Dreams, Freud analyzes the dreams of himself and others in order in order to find the purpose of dreams in terms of his own psychoanalytic definition of the mind, in which psychological forces of pleasure seeking and restraint are at constant ends. Freud determines that the principle function of dreams is to fulfill the wishes of the id, or “pleasure principle” which wants instant gratification, so that the ego, the part of the brain that thinks about long term success, can get rest. However if one digs deeper into Freud’s inability to fully disclose his own dreams, and sees that when he “discove(red) the solution of the dream all kinds of things were revealed which (he) was unwilling to admit even to (himself).” …show more content…
Freud calls the dreams we directly see the “manifest dream” (DUKKY) whilst calling the latent themes behind dreams, appropriately, “latent dream thoughts.” (DUKKY) Freud claimed that components featured in in manifest dreams where representations of latent dream thoughts that represented desires. Hence, the manifest dreams allow people to act out their desires. Freud cited several examples of children’s dreams which could be very clearly interpreted as desire fulfillment dreams. For one, he cites a boy who “ had only been allowed to taste a single sample (of cherries)” and then had a dream in which he awoke saying “Hermann eaten all the chewwies!” (DREEEAMS) He then cites another dream in which a girl made a lake trip which was “evidently not long enough for her, for she cried when she had to get off the boat” and then she had a dream where “she had been for a trip on the lake: she had been continuing her interrupted voyage.—”(DREAMS) as well as a dream in which a boy saw himself “climbing Dachstein” because he was denied seeing it earlier. Freud stated that these dreams were “simple and undisguised wish-fulfilments.” (DREAMS) However he did not stop with just simple wish fulfillments, but went on to more complicated, perplexing dreams. Freud claims that for adults “a differentiation has occurred in the psychical material” (DREAMS) which creates dreams, which intern makes …show more content…
This concept is also called repression. In Freud 's Introductory lecture XIX he describes repression as a mechanism in which there is a “violent opposition… against the entry into consciousness of the questionable mental process, and for that reason it remained unconscious.” (NOTES) This repression serves as a “precondition for the construction of symptoms” for hysterics, until it can be brought to consciousness by psychoanalysis. Clearly something that Freud was “unwilling to admit even to (himself).”(DREAMS) falls within the range of a “questionable mental process” which “remained unconscious” until, with the psychoanalysis of his own dream, he was able to dig up. In On Dreams Freud delves into the mysterious qualities of dreams, using words like “displacement” to describe confusion in dreams and “condensation” to describe the tying of many latent dream thoughts into a single item in the manifest dream. Seeing as though these processes of condensation and displacement where able to take themes inside of Freud’s mind and hide them directly from his consciousness, is it not fair to say that these features are a form of repression? Hence, dreams themselves can be said to repress ideas, memories, or themes by scrambling the bridge between manifest

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