The Pupil Analysis

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Register to read the introduction… Moreen’s relationship with Morgan is not common for a mother and her son. She treats him like a mere object and considers him to be worthless as he “fetch[es] her fan”. Readers can also infer that Mrs. Moreen speaks harshly of him because Pemberton is able to note that a “boy of eleven shouldn’t catch” the things she says. Nevertheless, she still has the caring heart of a parent and the reader can assume that she chose Pemberton because he was the most intelligent and wants the finest tutor for son, who must be dealing with a medical condition. Assuring Pemberton that his wage will be “quite regular”, he is able to understand that the definition of “regular” varies between

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