The Pros And Cons Of The Stop And Frisk Policy

Good Essays
The stop and frisk policy is this idea that police officers can stop, question, and pat someone down on the street if there is reasonable suspicion or probable cause that they are committing, have committed, or is in the process of committing a crime. In addition, police officers are able to stop and frisk an individual if they are concerned with the safety of themselves or others. This practice exists as a way to what is supposed to reduce crime rates and help keep communities safe.
However, the stop and frisk policy does not help prevent harm from occurring in communities. According to the New York Civil Liberties Union, studies have shown that the stop and frisk do not actually reduce crime rates. In most of the stops done because of the officers’ beliefs that there is weapon involvement, nothing is usually found, which means that no arrest is made. This means that a lot of the stops done, are done to innocent people. In the New York Civil Liberties Union article, “Stop and Frisk Data”, it even states, “Nearly nine of 10 stopped-and-frisked New Yorkers have been completely innocent.”
…show more content…
The New York Civil Liberties Union article, “Stop and Frisk Data”, further mentioned, “In 2015, New Yorkers were stopped by the police 22,939 times. 18,353 were totally innocent (80 percent). 12,223 were black (54 percent). 6,598 were Latino (29 percent). 2,567 were white (11 percent).” It is clear that people are not treated fairly under the stop and frisk policy. However, people can be treated fairly under this policy if we get rid of the negative labels that categorize groups of people as criminals, but it is going to be hard given the fact that these negative labels are already out there and sooner or later, we are going to hear them

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Civilians do not follow the “blue code of silence” where police do not tattle on other officers to keep a good reputation. Civilian watch groups will ensure that no corruption will take place among police departments and that the police will be placed accountable for unjust actions. Another way to prevent law enforcement from targeting minorities is to implement body cameras on all officers. According to Stuart (2014), body-worn cameras are a major development for police and have received greater attention after Michael Brown’s death. Police are less likely to use force against civilians while wearing body cameras.…

    • 1360 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Police Ticketing Quotas

    • 1586 Words
    • 7 Pages

    So they made the quotas system more informal. Quotas can seriously hurt society, the point of a quota system is to catch everyone who is breaking the law, but it isn’t always looking out for the people…

    • 1586 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Police Brutality Problem

    • 1288 Words
    • 6 Pages

    We have to be more cautious about our actions when dealing with the police. We should also be more respectful to police officers even if we do not trust them, because they will protect us no matter what. In conclusion, police brutality is excessive force that many police officers have used and still continue to use on any citizen. Police brutality is not fair and it is beginning to effect our community more each day and it can make a situation worse than what it really is. We cannot stop police brutality but we can avoid it by not putting ourselves in bad…

    • 1288 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Although the cameras offer footage to defend the victim (or police officer) in a brutality case, when are the cameras unnecessary and an invasion of privacy? If public access is permitted, what are the boundaries to protect the personal information of ones being recorded? “Without the right safeguards, there is a real risk that these new devices could become instruments of injustice” (Mendoza). According to the article “Police Body Cameras,” if anyone can access the footage, and the footage contains addresses, family life, or other sorts of private information of ones recorded, it could potentially put them in danger; this could cause victims to avoid police officer interaction, which leads to less crimes stopped. If public access is not permitted to the body camera footage, the footage is untrustworthy; “limiting public and media access to these videos undermines the very purpose of body cameras” (“Police Body Cameras”).…

    • 748 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Response Memo

    • 821 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Response Memo, Week Three Charlotte Freitag In their policy-shifting report “Broken Windows: The Police and Neighborhood Safety”, Wilson and Kelling (1982) make a case for why they believe proactive policing would help lower crime rates nationally and promote feelings of comfort across communities. They argue that the widespread usage of foot patrolling officers, as opposed to officers patrolling in vehicles, would promote positive civilian interactions and would deter crime, as the physical presence of police officers would dissuade potential criminals from acting out in public spaces (Wilson and Kelling 1982). Their assertions are based on research the Police Foundation conducted in Newark, New Jersey, where they observed how the presence of foot patrol officers shaped the community and its crime rate (Wilson and Kelling 1982). After the experiment ran its course, they concluded that while the actual crime rate was unchanged, residents perceived the neighborhood as safer than it had been before the foot patrol officers began circulating the area…

    • 821 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Response To Moral Panic

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages

    According to Wasserman, legislature regarding issues like child molesting, the protection of fetuses, and drugs were passed too hurriedly as the result of moral panics. These solutions are presented to the public to ensure that something is being done, but these solutions aren’t foolproof. It has yet to be determined if the solution of implementing body cameras is just a hasty response to moral panic. It appears, if balanced, that it’s a good policy. Every stakeholder…

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, according to MacDonald (2004) “there is nothing illegal about using race as one factor among others in assessing criminal suspiciousness.” Personally, I don 't believe someone 's race should affect the way police officers work. It is unfortunate that people of color have more run ins with police officers due to the color of their skin. It is stated in Catalan (2014) “found that 70 departments from Connecticut to California arrest Blacks at a rate 10 times more than people of other races.” People of color should not have to 'walk on eggshells ' so to speak. We, as citizens, are supposed to be able to rely on the police to protect us, but how are we supposed to do that if it feels like they 're against us? In Catalan 's (2014) report it is also stated that “Only 173 of the 3,538 police departments USA Today examined arrested Black people at a rate equal to or lower than other racial groups.” To me that is very shocking how uneven it is.…

    • 1370 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    About Stop, Question, and Frisk Stop, question, and frisk (SQF) is a tactics used in New York City by police officers to help lower crime rates. This tactic entails police officers to stop any suspicious person on the streets if they have reasonable suspicion about a crime that happened, is happening, or is about to happen and question the suspect. If the officer believes the suspect is armed and dangerous, they have the authority the do a quick pat-down of the suspect’s outer clothing to see if they have any weapons on them; this is known as frisking. “From the perspective of New York City police officials, these stops are essential to maintaining public safety. From the perspective of many citizens who are stopped by officers, the encounters…

    • 1276 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Police Officer Duties

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Some jurisdictions are using proactive policing. This form of policing is used to prevent issues from becoming more serious, but it is often referred as an aggressive approach to policing. Officers do not wait on calls, they are instead policing high crime areas and making arrests to deter people from criminal activity. Patrol officers also use another form of policing called, broken window model. This model targets low income areas, areas with vacant lots, areas with gangs roaming the streets, and prostitution.…

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Over policing is when police more often target certain groups – such as young people and ethnic minorities – than someone who is not from a suspect minority (White, 2010, p 310). From this definition it can arguably be said that over policing is a large reason why the police are seen as unfair and discriminatory in their nature of work. The argument for over policing is that it is crime prevention; if the police are picking certain suspect groups to harass and over-surveillance then the idea is there that they can prevent more large scale crimes from happening (Daly, 2006). Obviously to the groups that are being targeted this is unfair and can be seen as an invasion of privacy to innocent…

    • 1067 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays