The Pros And Cons Of The Real ID Act

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The Real ID Act, which was sponsored by Representative Jerry Lewis and signed into law by the President on May 11, 2005, has set federal standards for the issuance of driver’s licenses and requires aliens to prove their "legal presence" in the United States (Thomas, HR 1268.) Its basic purpose is to ensure that state-issued licenses and IDs meet certain standards and requirements that the federal government sets before they will be considered valid. This piece of legislation has caused quite a bit of debate since its origination and passage into law. Some throughout the United States support this piece of legislation because they believe it will protect our country, as well as keep us out of harms way with regard to terrorism. However, many other Americans believe that problems will arise if the Real ID Act goes into place. …show more content…
The 9/11 Commission proposed that the United States needed to improve its system for issuing secure identification documents” (DHS, Guidelines). In the Commission’s words, “At many entry points to vulnerable facilities, including gates for boarding aircraft, sources of identification are the last opportunity to ensure that people are who they say they are and to check whether they are terrorists.” The Commission specifically urged the federal government to “set standards for the issuance of…sources of identification, such as driver’s licenses.” Congress responded to this key recommendation by passing the Real ID Act (DHS, …show more content…
The American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, the American Liberty Association, the Association for Computing Machinery, the National Council of State Legislatures, the American Immigration Lawyers Association and the National Governors Association are among those concerned.” (Daily Vidette, Kawanna.) With this type of outcry from the country, it has to make you wonder if its worth going the distance and putting the Real ID Act into submission. Of course, you have your reasoning’s for public safety and it makes a good argument for identity left, but it seems like there are still too many holes, and it would eventually fall through and face many risks in the long run. As for right now, it seems that many of the states are still waiting until they can find enough evidence to where this act will work for them and assured it will be a benefit for there own citizens as well. “Pressure will increase on Congress as more states affirmatively refuse the system,” says the Cato Institute 's Harper. “I don 't think there 's any way that Congress gets out of reconsidering Real ID, though they could do nothing and Real ID will just collapse.” “Along the same lines, Quam of the National Governors Association told the Senate, “You 're going to see more states ask the question, 'Is this worth it? If it can 't work, why do it?” (CQ Researcher) Which leads to me ask the same question: If there

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