Philadelphia Convention Vs Anti Federalism

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The Government that was created after the Revolutionary war was too weak to mend the conflicts that were arising from the States; the Government was operating under the Articles of Confederation. The Philadelphia Convention agreed to help correct some of the holes in the Articles that had long since been determined even before the war. The Philadelphia Convention was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from May 14th to September 17th in the year of 1787. Even though the Convention was actually proposed to revise the articles, James Madison, residing from Virginia, and Alexander Hamilton, from New York, had something entirely different in mind. Madison and Hamilton did not intend on revising the Articles but rather creating a new Government rather than fixing the one that was already agreed upon. George Washington, Virginia, was elected as president of the convention. The Founding Fathers, known as the 55 delegates who originally drafted the constitution were in attendance. …show more content…
Unfortunately at first this motion was defeated after a brief discussion. Following the Philadelphia Convention some leaders during the revolution publicly opposed the Constitution, this became known as “Anti-Federalism”. The opposed because they believed if the National Government became too strong it would also be a threat to individual rights and the President would gain too much. When advocating the Bill of Rights, Jefferson wrote to Madison: “Half a loaf is better than no bread. If we cannot secure all our rights, let us secure what we can.” (CITE HERE) Federalist, in favor of the constitution opposed the bill of rights because of the uncertainty it may

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