The Pros And Cons Of The League Of Nations

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The League of Nations was intended to be a peace treaty between foreign nations and the United States. It was also intended to prevent the start of any new wars. Even though the League of Nations had resolved many disputes between countries, “it was in fact unable to prevent several major military actions from taking place” (Justice). Therefore, I do not believe that joining the League of Nations was the best idea for the United States at that time. Joining the League of Nations required the United States to be drawn into foreign affairs, which were not important concerns for the United States. Also, the League of Nations interfered with the Monroe Doctrine of 1823, which was a “violation of American sovereignty long established under the Monroe …show more content…
had not officially joined the League, however members of the cabinet were associated with the Leagues actions. The main problem with the League of Nations was that the Monroe Doctrine was violated. America was not supposed to interfere with European nations because it was an act of aggression. If the U.S. joined the League of Nations it would have brought the U.S. into foreign disputes, which would cause the violation. The Monroe Doctrine was established “to prevent European intervention in the Western Hemisphere and American intervention in European affairs” (Justice). For one, the U.S. was drawn into affairs that did not concern the U.S. When President Monroe wrote the Monroe Doctrine he stated, “our first and primary obligation should be to never interfere in European affairs; and second, never permit Europe to interfere in our affairs” (Justice). When the U.S. violated this Doctrine, it went against the peace that America had against foreign nations. For example, the League of Nations had not prevented many of the significant events that led to the cause of World War II. This showed that the League was unable to avoid conflicts between foreign nations. Also the League was unable to control major foreign powers because it lacked stability from its members. By not being associated with the League the U.S. could have prevented many conflicts before the Great War known as World War …show more content…
The primary goal of the League was to prevent conflicts between the nations, and it could not do that because of the ineffectiveness of the League as a whole. The Treaty of Versailles had many amends that the League of Nations was supposed to enforce, but was not enforced. Critics argued that the League was not reassuring because the League had to have actions approved by individuals that were apart of the council. The United States sat on the edge of the unjust Treaty of Versailles and also on the edge of the League of Nations, for it was not an actual member of the League. Also, because of the prior treaty made the League set the stage for an even more devastating outcome that no one

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