The Pros And Cons Of The Hippocratic Oath

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The Hippocratic Oath was created around the 4th or 5th century BC as an ethical code for physicians to follow. The original oath swore "I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect. Similarly I will not give to a woman an abortive remedy." Now, however, most modern versions omit the prohibition of euthanasia and abortion in the oaths. Society's view of morality has obviously altered since Hippocrates time, as seen by the controversy created by 6 states legalizing physician assisted suicide. There are many conflicting views on Physician Assisted Suicide (PAS): some claim PAS would be a form of active euthanasia while others deny that it is euthanasia at all and some claim it is …show more content…
The Euthanasia Society of America was founded 32 years later and was later renamed "Society for the Right to Die," as the term suicide was too crass generally repelled people from promoting this cause. (LifeNews.com). Florida was the next state to attempt a "right to die" bill in 1967, but once again it was rejected. In 1968, Harvard redefined death and the differences between brain dead and circulatory death(death w dignity). A court case in New York, Quill V Vacco, ruled that assisted suicide was different that the refusal of life-saving treatment in 1997. Washington V Glucksberg had ruled that a suicide and assisted suicide was not a right protected by the Due Process Clause. Unfortunately, in 2008 Washington state legalized assisted suicide with the End of Life Options …show more content…
States of California, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Vermont, and Montana have legalized Physician Assisted Suicide. The methods may vary from IV to consumption but it is usually a prescribed drug administered. These graphs show how many recorded people have used the Oregon and Washington Death with Dignity Acts compared to how many received prescriptions. Approximately 1/3 of the known recipients of prescriptions in Oregon ultimately decided against taking the drug. In Washington, however, almost all of the recipients committed suicide (Guardian). According to California and Colorado laws, doctors are required and allowed to falsify the cause of death on death certificates in Physician Assisted Suicide cases and label it as the terminal illness, not the drug, that ended the patient's life (Durangoherald.com, Guardian). This skews data of cause of

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