Compare And Contrast Jeffersonians And The Federalists

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George Washington, being a wise and an experienced president, warned the individuals of the United States of America to not use factions, as this concept would not be beneficial for the newly made independent nation. Historical figures such as Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson decided not to listen to Washington’s plead. Both men created two political parties that reflected one another’s beliefs. Hamilton stood behind the Federalist party as Jefferson did the same for the Democratic-Republican party, which is also known as the Republicans. Each party had opposing views of one another. The Republicans feared the the government would gain too much power while the Federalist craved a strong government to help the nation. Congress passed …show more content…
Congress was primary Federalist making it easier for Adam’s to pass laws. The Federalist past these acts because they felt threatened by the immigrants coming into the United States. The Naturalization Act enabled immigrants to become citizens after fourteen years rather than five years. “And provided also, that no alien…of any nation or state with whom the United States shall be at war… shall be then admitted to become a citizen of the United States. . .” The Federalists were afraid of what would happen if the United States went to war with another nation. Federalists did not want the aliens to betray this nation and join the opposing country. The second part is identified as the Alien Act, which allowed the President to deport any alien who posed a threat to this country. “That it shall be lawful for the President of the United States… to order all such aliens as he shall judge dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States…” If an alien was deported, they would need the permission of the President to reenter the country. The Alien Enemies Act was the third part of Alien and Sedition …show more content…
If the individual seemed to be dangerous and threatening, they would be deported back to their country. The last part of the act is called the Sedition Act. “That if any person shall write, print, utter or publish… any false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings against the government of the United States…with intent to defame the said government…” The Federalist wanted to defend the government from being portrayed in a bad light from false writing. Federalists overall wanted to protect the government so that citizens will not upraise and threaten

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