The Pros And Cons Of The Amethyst Initiative

1905 Words 8 Pages
For many years, one of the biggest issues nationwide has been the abuse of alcohol by all age groups; however, this is primarily true for the 18-21 year old age bracket. In 1987, Ronald Reagan and his administration pressured states by threatening local funding cuts. His ultimate goal was for a nationwide minimum legal drinking age of 21 (Tooney, et al, 2009). Supporters of this, such as Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), believed that this law would end drunk driving related deaths. As a counteraction to MADD, the Amethyst Initiative formed. The Amethyst Initiative was a group consisting of over 135 university presidents in favor of lowering the legal drinking age to 18 as of May 11, 2009 (Tooney, et al, 2009). John McCardell, former-president …show more content…
They gain the right to vote, buy cigarettes, get married, serve on juries in the court of law, and join the United States army. One thing they cannot do is purchase or consume alcohol legally. People supporting a minimum legal drinking age of 21 years old will often mention that 18 year olds are not responsible enough to handle the responsibility of alcohol. Our government trusts 18 year olds to head off into foreign territories to fight; however, they do not trust them to drink alcohol safely. Opponents in debate often say in that an 18 year old cannot be president. They will mention this to prove that not all rights are just given to people just because they are legally an adult (Should the drinking age be lowered from 21 to a younger age?, 2015). Running for president requires a 35 year old, because of the need for political and life experience. The personal right of young adults up next to the right one has to lead the United States is not a fair …show more content…
Stated always decided the minimum legal drinking age up until 1988 (Tooney, et al, 2009). Tooney, et al. (2009) goes on to explain that between 1970 and 1980 many states had varying minimum legal drinking ages that fell everywhere between 18 and 21. Michigan was the first state to raise its legal drinking age to 21 in 1978. After that, 17 more states followed in the forthcoming years (Tooney, et al, 2009). In 1984, Ronald Reagan and his administration developed the National Minimum Drinking Act of 1984 (Tippett, 2015). Reagan required all states to make their minimum legal drinking age 21 by 1986. If they failed to do this, they would face a loss of their federal highway funds. By 1988, all states had some form of this law which made the legal drinking age of 21 (Tooney, et al, 2009). It is vital that our society sees all the facts to make a conscientious decision regarding the justness and fairness of this

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