The Pros And Cons Of The Afterlife

1032 Words 5 Pages
Throughout the history of humanity, there have been an array of theories and mystical stories about what exist after one’s death. Seemly enough, the afterlife has been a topic that has fascinated the human mind for centuries. In most cases, especially when it comes to the grand story of Christianity (particularly the New Testament century and on), there is a belief that there are two separate locations: one realm dealing with the wicked and the other dealing with individuals deemed righteous. There have been an array of theological discussion and debate on this phenomenon. This perception assuming a judgement day deeming individuals either or (righteous versus wicked), is an argument in and of itself and frankly for another day. Thus, let us …show more content…
Where do people go once the last breath has been taken? In particular, what and where is heaven, hell? This is one question that can be difficult to tackle and could be written about for pages. Nonetheless, let us turn to N.T. Wright, a famous Anglican Bishop and New Testament academic, to shed some light on this matter. As stated by N.T. Wright, the way that many Christian believers, especially those in the Western world, think of the afterlife is an erroneous view. However, what is important about Wright’s frame of reference here is that it indeed is from the Bible. Many individuals would debate that there are two distinct destinations in a different dimension that one might travel to once life has reached its end: heaven and hell. Yet, this assumption is not one that is profound since there are references to these locations …show more content…
He seems to not go in such depth on this topic than the last. However, in this instance I seemed to disagree with him. Wright would probably explain this difference in interpretations as I am one that is too left brained. Which may be the case, but that is not the issue. Wright asserts that much of the Revelation is metaphorical language, which on that part I would agree. With that, he states that hell may not be a place of fire and pain. However, there are other scenarios in the New Testament where this is stated outside of the book Revelation. For example, Matthew 13:50 and Mark 9:43. The Gospels are commonly known as narrative books rather than metaphorical (although Jesus did teach metaphorically), seemly discrediting what Wright is referring to here. What I do not like about Wrights reasoning on this is that he does not use much scriptural examples for his stance like he used on the topic of heaven. Nonetheless, a fiery pit or not, I do believe that hell is a place that exists without the presence of God. So, either way there is misery and pain. 2 Thessalonians 1:9 states, “They will be punished with everlasting destruction and shut out from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might.” Another example of this wording can be found in Matthew

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