The Pros And Cons Of Smoking

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Tobacco use remains the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States. In a report,(name of report) it cites that nearly 450,000 Americans die every year from smoking-related illnesses (Surgeon General, 2016). The same report revealed that cigarette smoking is responsible for 30 percent of all cancer deaths and 80 percent of coronary obstructive pulmonary Disease (COPD) and early cardiovascular disease and death (2016). By 2013, 8.7 percent of annual spending in the U.S. is attributable to cigarette smoking, costing nearly $170 billion dollars. The Smoking-Attributable Mortality (SAM) paid more than 60 percent of the attributable spending by a government program (XU, BISHOP, KENNEDY, SIMPSON & PECHACEK, 2015). Although …show more content…
Similar concerns in other countries, with long histories of smoking, have been raised. In contrast to the U.S., Britain’s smoking rates among 16 to 19 year olds remained the same in 2001 as in 1988, whereas British adult smoking rates declined from 1988 to 2001 (Amos, Wiltshire, Haw & McNeill, 2005). Recent qualitative studies have shown that the meanings that older teenagers attach to their smoking, and understanding or believing they are truly addicted, may affect their motivation to quit or seek out the use of effective intervention programs (Amos, Wiltshire, Haw & McNeill, 2005). The complex dimension of how teens think and view behavior may be a hindrance to their self-initiation to quit smoking. There is also evidence that patterns and levels of smoking in adolescents is influenced by changes in peer groups and friends, furthermore research displays the importance of young smokers to enhance their social identity through smoking with others (Amos, Wiltshire, Haw & McNeill, 2005). This sort of peer pressure can cause teen smokers to be less likely to understand the impact of smoking on their long-term health. According to Amos, Wiltshire, Haw and McNeill (2005), a study done …show more content…
The methods used in the Nottinghamshire cessation school program involved students ages 13-16. The survey included a questionnaire that was self-completed. Smokers who wanted to quit were identified and invited to participate in focus groups. A semi structured discussion guide was used as the framework for the focus groups. Many of the participants were in favor of support from a counselor who was trained to help them stop smoking and welcomed advice from ex-smokers (Moylneux, Lewis et al.,

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