Science Fiction Definition

1666 Words 7 Pages
What comes to mind when people think science fiction? In reality, this depends on what literature the person has had experience with. I think you could accurately guess that the first thing a lot of people might come up with would be Hunger Games. However, some people might bring out more classic literature like War of the Worlds. You can confuse yourself more by asking someone what science fiction is. Everyone seems to have their own opinions on this subject and you might even start a fiery debate. With the rise in popularity of young adult science fiction and other speculative genes, many think that the distinction between the genres is near non-existent. Analyzing works of young adult science fiction can show how science fiction is …show more content…
Science fiction, to me, was a genre of books that involved certain plausible speculations for the future—particularly involving technology. My earliest encounter with science fiction in literature was when I first read John Christopher’s The Tripods series. These books are a prime example of young adult invasion literature mixed with dystopian concepts. They involve a future world where humanity is under control of Tripods. The Tripods are made out of an advanced form of technology and are able to control the human population with metal electronic implants called “caps.” The elements of the future, the technological implications, and the scientific explanations clearly defined this series as science fiction for me. These books were instrumental in forming the definition of the genre in my mind. I deduced genre easily to a few concepts: if it could happen now, it was realistic; in the past, it was historical, and if in the future, it was science fiction. Everything else was fantasy. Then, an acquaintance kept calling random books science fiction and I started to see how the genre wasn’t as concrete as I …show more content…
It is taught in schools and the division of literature in this way can be the source of much argument, which suggests that this is something people actually care about. An article on genre and critical analysis states, “genres do not simply help us define and organize kinds of texts; they also help us define and organize kinds of social action, social actions that these texts rhetorically make possible” (Bawarshi 355). Genre does not only make important distinctions for critical study, but also changes the way we experience and respond to a novel. It’s frustrating for readers when they cannot easily locate certain types of books that they are trying to find or are misguided in their search. When they come across what they think is part of a concept that they buy into, but instead adds elements of magic or horror that they weren’t prepared for and maybe would rather not deal with, the experience is disappointing. In addition, I think that new genres should be embraced so that people know more of what they are getting and to encourage new authors to rise up with new ideas. Accepting new genres as something separate and recognizing innovative young adult works as just that might lend a greater credibility to the concept of genre and speculative genres in realm of young adult

Related Documents