The Pros And Cons Of Medical Technology And Ethical Issues

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Death of a family member can be painful and heartbreaking. When a person is put in a situation to pull the plug or keep the person alive, the decision can be troublesome. A decision such as life or death towards a loved one shouldn’t be made by one person only. That’s why doctors play a major role in this situation, doctors can help us determine what we should do. However, Doctors don’t always make rational decisions in a stressful situation, they need extra help as well. The RIP system can be helpful for doctors while making the tough call. In the selection, “Medical Technology and Ethical Issues” by William E. Thompson and Joseph V. Hickey, the authors discuss the sociological and ethical issues related to medical technology. Although, the …show more content…
The RIP system is a worldwide computer program used to help doctors make knowledgeable decisions. The RIP is able to give a percentage of survival and the treatment needed for the patient. The critics are quite terrify by the new computer program. As stated in the article, the critics disagree with the RIP system because it creates an overreliance on computer technology to make decisions. Medical Ethicist, Arthur Caplan, disagree with the RIP system stating the chances of the computer program being wrong will be 5 percent. While the critics rant about the computerized systems, supporters of the RIP system, argues that the system is just to help doctors make more informed decisions and to use resources effectively. Besides the debate whether to use the system or not, sociologist are more concerned about the sociological consequences of medical technology. To conclude the selection, sociologist feels as if medical staff and doctors should be mindful of the effects that computer technology can …show more content…
I liked how the authors supported their reasons by using data and rhetorical question. For example, the article “Medical Technology and Ethical Issues” mention how the RIP system can give a percentage of survival and the treatment needed. A probability of 95 percent or higher of the patient dying, the patient will not receive treatment. If the percent is greater than 5 of the patient surviving, the patient will receive treatment. (Thompson & Hickey 2000, Pg. 504). Doctors cannot predict your chances of surviving like a computer program can. The article “Medical Technology and Ethical Issues” also mention how Arthur Caplan pointed out that the computer system will be wrong in 5 percent of all cases (Thompson & Hickey 2000, Pg. 504) but, 5 percent is not a lot compared to the average mistakes humans make every day. Another good point the article made was how computers don’t discriminate against race, age and poverty level. According to Thompson & Hickey (2000), sociologist has questioned the decisions made in the past by doctors and how a computerized system will less likely discriminate (Pg. 504). The RIP system will treat everyone fairly, but some individuals will

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