The Pros And Cons Of Marijuana

1500 Words 6 Pages
Marijuana has been an increasingly controversial topic in America for years, playing a central role in American culture and countercultures. Although polls suggest that there is not a large gap between those who believe it should be legalized or kept illegal, the majority believes that it should remain illegal (Milligan, 2014). This opinion is reinforced by the media’s stereotypical portrayal of a marijuana consumer, commonly referred to as a “pothead” and depicted as unmotivated in such propaganda. This perspective is typically found among the older generations, however, as science and politics are now revealing the pros of marijuana legalization, the younger generations are getting behind the movement to legalize marijuana (Milligan, 2014). …show more content…
If marijuana were to be legalized, it would open up a new tax source through marijuana and hemp sales and production, which would help stabilize and improve our economy (Caulkins et al., 2013). Also by legalizing marijuana, the government would be able to better regulate it, enforcing measures to ensure that only people of age would use it, and it would remain a controlled substance. This would virtually break down the black market marijuana business, making it a much safer business once the regulations are in place (Boaz, 2000). Many who oppose legalization claim they are concerned about the safety of marijuana, based mainly on the media’s portrayal of it as well as outdated studied that were later discredited. In reality, marijuana has been scientifically proven to have positive medicinal uses, treating various conditions from Multiple Sclerosis to helping cancer patients through chemotherapy (Moffat, 2002). The legalization of marijuana would have a revolutionary effect on America’s economy and safety as well as offer new forms of progressive medicine to the American …show more content…
The federal government spends over sixteen billion dollars to enforce drug laws every year, not including the costs to house and care for those convicted drug offenders. Putting this in perspective, that is about ten billion estimated taxpayers’ dollars a year because taxpayers pay for each individual sent to prison just for possession of marijuana (Boaz, 2000). A very striking example of these laws would be Louisiana, where being caught with a joint could result in six months in the country parish, while a second offense can result in up to five years, and a third up to twenty years of jail time (Barcott 2014). Not to mention that the prohibition of marijuana is commonly a waste of police officer’s time, especially in the eyes of police officers themselves, some of which have joined a group called Law Enforcement Against Prohibition. Jack Cole, retired New Jersey State Police Lieutenant, has made some valuable points such as when an officer could have been investigating something serious, such as domestic abuse, current prohibition laws require officers to instead invest their time chasing a couple of harmless teenagers smoking marijuana. Another valuable point he makes is that the arrests of drug dealers and manufacturers does not have a major impact in the war on drugs because a new dealer and

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