The Indian Removal Act

Great Essays
The United States has a lot of power and control over everything. "Manifest Destiny was a phrase that was coined to help influence and manipulate the minds of Americans."1 Manifest Destiny was the strong belief that the Americans had a God given right to expand across the North American continent. This expansion and new way of thinking, enforced western settlement, caused Native American to lose their land, provoked war with Mexico, and had other stipulations that created wrong doing throughout the United States and other continents.
First, If Manifest Destiny meant that God wanted the Americans to force western settlement from coast to coast, is it Manifest Destiny? With any religious background God promotes peace and not war and destruction.
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"The Indian Removal Act was signed by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830. The Indian Removal Act authorized a series of migrations that became known as the Trail of Tears."3 Andrew Jackson made it his mission to free up land that the Indians had lived on. This removal act was just a way for the government to make more money off their land and a forceful way to move tribes away from their homes. The tribes were rounded up at gunpoint by the U.S military and were sent thousands of miles to a new reservation. When the tribes made their journey across the states, it was pointless because the land in Oklahoma was eventually taken away from them anyway. The trail of tears was taken by five main tribes. "These tribes included the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, creek, and Seminole."4 On this trail, adults and children often died from starvation, diseases, and some of them even died from the cold. When the tribes reached certain parts of the trail they forced to pay a dollar so they could continue their journey, whereas the European Americans only had to pay sixty-five cents. With this being the case, some of the Indians froze to death in one location because they did not have enough funds to proceed. President Andrew Jackson caused all the suffering that the Indians suffered when they moved west from …show more content…
Abolitionists were a group that were completely against slavery. They thought it was wrong and sinful. The church was torn between idea of slavery and religion. Abolitionists created a big impact on slavery and the freedom of slaves. "Although they were never large in number, abolitionists exerted extraordinary influence in catalyzing debates and issues that brought on the American Civil War. These individuals differed from others who opposed slavery because they favored immediately ending slavery without compensating slave owners for the loss of their “property” and without relocating freed slaves outside the United States."6 This is also when sectionalism came into place. "Sectional conflict between the Northern and Southern U.S led to the civil war. The civil war put a halt to the Manifest

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