The Pros And Cons Of Industrialization In America

1213 Words 5 Pages
During the 19th century, America, more so in the South, was still recovering from the Civil War. With slaves no longer being a valuable means of labor the South had to start finding more ways for production. This huge blow to the South forced the South to start industrializing and reforming into the “New South.” The cons of industrialization are far greater than the pros. Industrialization brought the U.S. the worth of time, a split in social class, drugs, expansion, and death. Industrialization was the root of evil in the sense that it brought the worst out in America through greed, racial discrimination, and many deaths. In the late 19th century the U.S. was on its way to becoming a world power, with the help of industrialization and westward …show more content…
In the eyes of big businesses the U.S. began to be consumed with time, as though it was a commodity. For a businessman, in the 19th century, everything about industrialization was nothing but beneficial for them. A small group of people, who gained enormous amount of wealth through industrialization were called the "New Money", this group of people did nothing but benefit from Industrialization. As John D. Rockefeller was reported to have said was that, "The growth of a large business is merely [the] survival of the fittest." The fittest in this case was the rich businessman and the way they survived was through the energy of the unfit, the workers. During this time it was the rise of the business to the expense of the workers. People had to work for many hours with very little to almost nothing in return, not to mention the dangers of working at this time. Not only did men have to work but women and children also had to do hard labor as well. With high demand, there was more production, and to keep up with this high demand workers had to work long shifts. This caused people to have less sleep, and with less sleep people needed a boost for work, thus bringing America to drugs to help with some of the long …show more content…
"The United States of America during the nineteenth century could quite properly be described as a "dope fiend 's paradise." Drugs in America during the 19th century was not looked at as a corruption in America as it is today, but most drugs that were brought to America, such as laudanum, were considered as a boost to help people get on through the day. Not only were these opiates a boost for the day they were also legally distributed and consumed. Opium, Laudanum, and other opiates were distributed out in America so frequently that one go get these drugs so casually over the counter; or could sell, buy, and distribute these drugs without worry because these drugs were legalized and needed in America. These dangerous drugs were so relied on to go about the day that even mothers gave their infants as a soothing medicine. America, in the 19th century, ran off of opiates as a way of life and as leisurely as Tylenol today. Alcohol, at this time, was the biggest drug used, and caused more violence through the streets. With industrialization requiring so much work for people, all the workers and citizens relied and used

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