United States Immigration Policy Essay

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A policy expresses basic sets of rules that are proposed by a governing body or individuals which dictate the course of action for a particular activity. Today the United States of America is faced with the biggest question ever asked in history. What are the rights and limitations of immigrants for coming to the United States every year? In the year 2013 it was recorded that an astounding 11.6 million immigrants, especially from Mexico, illegally cross into American soil (Bush and Bolick). In that year, it was documented that approximately 41.3 million immigrants came in the United States. The individuals accounts for 13 percent of the American population.
Immigration policies have grown in popularity as more and more leaders became aware
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It is expressly concerned with the people who have a desire to stay and work in the country (West). It is true to say that we just cannot allow all people to cross over into our borders. All persons should be reviewed based on their potential contribution to the beneficiary country and the purpose of their stay. Immigration policies are built around these two qualifications. However, immigration policies can be biased. Often religious or racial bias is tied to the immigration of individuals (West). For example, first world countries have refused to accept Muslim refugees from war-torn …show more content…
Despite overseeing the immigration of thousands of individuals, it comes as a surprise that they are not in control of the release and detention of immigrants (Kubrin, Martinez, and Ztaz). The delay process aims to catch, process and prepare immigrants for possible deportation depending on their cases. This process should be fair and civil. Over the past two decades, the immigration detention system has grown dramatically. It has come from having to contain 7,500 individuals in the year 1995 to having to take in 34,000 persons today. These beds are spread across different facilities nationwide and are largely owned by private for-profit companies. The majority of the inhabitants of these facilities are low custody priorities they are no security risks as they have no criminal

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