Hip-Hop And Rap

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Hip-Hop and Rap have been regarded to be genres that promote gun violence, gang affiliation, and drugs. This however is not true. Hip-Hop and Rap has moved people emotionally and mentally throughout the years. Impacting and connecting individuals in riots within communities, more specifically in the US. These are usually triggered by the musical structure of the piece performed, along with the message being foretold to the audience. Artists in other genres such as Bob Marley, have accomplished touching and activating emotions change a community 's actions. Hip-Hop and Rap has also brought forth problems that may call for attention in some communities, such as gun violence, police brutality, and poverty in their societies.

Hip Hop originated
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Instruments such as double basses could be heard sampled within earlier hip-hop and rap songs. Sampling plays a significant role in defining the hip-hop sound, by taking kicks, snares, and snippets of any song and making it your own. A notable artist that popularized the method of producing music was Marley Marl. He had done this by using a sampler, specifically the E-mu SP1200, to take drum patterns, snares, and other bits of a song to produce popular beats. Using and introducing the sampler to the hip hop world, gives a distinct sound to the hip hop world. Popular artists today such as Kanye West, continue to use sampling systems such as Akai MPC2000. Sampling can be used to publicize an artist that may have been forgotten from the past, for example James Brown. James Brown was considered “corny” until duo, Eric B. & Rakim sampled the jazz musician in their hit song ‘Eric B is President’. Hip-Hop artists use these tools to portray messages or set a mood to their …show more content…
A popular group that managed to produce such classics were NWA, a group from Compton consisting of Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, MC Ren, and DJ Yella. A notable track that had captured the attention of the FBI was “F**k The Police”, which addressed police brutality whilst using aggressive production. Ice Cubes verse spoke of racial profiling that had occurred in Compton, California during the 80s, whilst still sticking to an imperfect rhyming scheme. For example using “underground” and “brown”. Ice Cubes aggressive tone also triggers and accurate represents the anger of the minorities victim of racial profiling. Some African American communities had experienced racial profiling despite discrimination laws being set twenty years prior. This angered african american communities, however there weren’t many songs that spoke about the subject. F**k the Police continued to caused riots against the police force, forcing the FBI to send a letter to the group banning them from performing the song during live concerts, however it didn’t stop them. This then led to their arrest. This shows the lyrical importance of the hip hop culture, even though there are times where music may not address issues occurring in today 's society. Songs such as MC Hammer 's, “U Can’t Touch This”(1990), and Sir Mix-a-Lots “Baby Got Back”(1992), did not address social issues but had an impact on society. Both songs had similar

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