The Pros And Cons Of Gay Marriage

1063 Words 5 Pages
The entire population of the United States has an opinion on gay marriage and whether gay couples have the right to marry. Americans ' views on gay marriage has shifted greatly over the past two decades. In 1996, a Gallup poll showed only 27 percent of Americans supported Gay marriage, with 68 percent opposing it. In 2015, however, a Washington Post poll found that 61 percent of Americans supported gay marriage and 35 percent opposed it. Polls have also shown that younger Americans tend to be more supportive of same-sex marriage (http://icof.infobaselearning.com.gmclibrary.idm.oclc.org/articles/rights-and-liberties/gay-rights-and-marriage.aspx?sr=1&articleID=6339). The subject is argued not only a personal level, but also on a large social …show more content…
Many gay couples rushed to get married once the state level bans were lifted. Now that the federal government has recognized gay marriage, many states counties are still failing to recognize gay couples right to marriage. The premise is that gay marriage is immoral and considered a sin in most religions, so it should be banned and marriage should only count between men and women. The argument is that people who are attracted to someone of their same sex has nothing to do with their ability to receive the same basic rights as straight couples. The argument is when denying same-sex couples the right to marry, is discriminatory and a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many Christians recognize that homosexuality is considered a sin, but also recognize that they have no authority to judge others although many others believe it is their duty as Christians to stand up and protest the legitimacy of Gay marriage. The need for separation of religion and government is part of the foundation of the United States Constitution. So, it is important to ensure everyone’s individual rights are protected whether certain groups agree with the subject or …show more content…
In the 1980s and 1990s, federal courts started looking at state statutes pertaining to homosexuality, and overturned several that outlawed homosexual practices. Some looked at Gay marriage from a religious point of view stating it was a sin to allow homosexuals to marry. Others looked at it as another burden to the United States because it would allow another group tax credits for being married. Then there were a large population in the country that did not care one way or another. Because of the large amount of people who felt the current laws at the time were unconstitutional there were in some states to correct the perceived discrimination. Some state legislatures also passed laws protecting homosexuals against employment discrimination, but only on the state level and not in the private sector. The passing of laws that supported gays and their individual rights to choose are considered protection under the Constitution. As a democratic country, supporting individual rights not only makes sense, but also supports the democratic belief of ones right to

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