Gay Marriage In The United States

The entire population of the United States has an opinion on gay marriage and whether gay couples have the right to marry. Americans ' views on gay marriage has shifted greatly over the past two decades. In 1996, a Gallup poll showed only 27 percent of Americans supported Gay marriage, with 68 percent opposing it. In 2015, however, a Washington Post poll found that 61 percent of Americans supported gay marriage and 35 percent opposed it. Polls have also shown that younger Americans tend to be more supportive of same-sex marriage (http://icof.infobaselearning.com.gmclibrary.idm.oclc.org/articles/rights-and-liberties/gay-rights-and-marriage.aspx?sr=1&articleID=6339). The subject is argued not only a personal level, but also on a large social …show more content…
Many gay couples rushed to get married once the state level bans were lifted. Now that the federal government has recognized gay marriage, many states counties are still failing to recognize gay couples right to marriage. The premise is that gay marriage is immoral and considered a sin in most religions, so it should be banned and marriage should only count between men and women. The argument is that people who are attracted to someone of their same sex has nothing to do with their ability to receive the same basic rights as straight couples. The argument is when denying same-sex couples the right to marry, is discriminatory and a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution. Many Christians recognize that homosexuality is considered a sin, but also recognize that they have no authority to judge others although many others believe it is their duty as Christians to stand up and protest the legitimacy of Gay marriage. The need for separation of religion and government is part of the foundation of the United States Constitution. So, it is important to ensure everyone’s individual rights are protected whether certain groups agree with the subject or …show more content…
In nineteen ninety-six, the Defense of Marriage Act was passed by Congress. This bill recognized only heterosexual marriages as a recognized union or marriage between two people. It also released states from same-sex marriages approved by other states (“Marriage Protection Amendment.”). Those in favor of allowing Defense of Marriage Act to stand, say that a marriage between a man and woman is one of the cornerstones of U.S. society, which traditionally of heterosexual marriages which many have viewed as a sacred union that is ordained by God. Another argument is that Gay marriages, cannot fulfill one of the fundamental purposes of marriage: which is procreation and raising children. In addition to the religious views many supporters of DOMA argue that the U.S. government cannot afford to provide benefits to a new group of people, if the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was overturned. They believe, the executive branch has a duty to defend laws that have been enacted by Congress, no matter what views the president may hold. The supporters of DOMA contend that, U.S. voters have overwhelmingly cast ballots against gay marriage (http://icof.infobaselearning.com.gmclibrary.idm.oclc.org/articles/families-and-youth/defense-of-marriage-act.aspx?sr=1&articleID=2127). The United States has a long history of segregation and treating different groups as second class citizens. The separation of church and state is a vital

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