The Pros And Cons Of Fossil Fuels

928 Words 4 Pages
America runs on fossil fuels. From lawn equipment, to transportation, to house hold items that most would not associate with fossil fuels, the demand for these forms of energy are increasing. The United States alone produces tens of millions of barrels annually. In 2015, U.S. oil production was at an all-time high of 9.4 million barrels daily (Sorry, OPEC: U.S. oil production at 43-year high, 2016). While the numbers look staggering, this is not enough to keep up with demand. The U.S. services about 40 percent of its own oil demands while the remaining needs are met with imports from Canada, Saudi Arabia, Africa, Latin America and other countries (Where Does America Get Oil? You May Be Surprised, 2012). This ever-growing dependency puts an …show more content…
While most people associate fossil fuels with oil, this category of energy also includes natural gas and coal. Almost 50 percent of America’s electricity is generated from coal burning power plants. These plants burn nearly 1.5 million tons of coal each year. An average 500 megawatt coal burning power plant puts out 3.2 million tons of carbon dioxide each year. This greenhouse gas is the leading pollutant responsible for global warming. It is not just the air pollution that should be of concern. This same power plant generates 125,000 tons of ash and another 193,000 tons of sludge from the smokestack scrubber (Facts on the Pollution caused by the US Coal …show more content…
Every aluminum can to every plastic bottle recycled reduces natural gas and oil consumption. Almost all tires produced in the United States are synthetic rubber which is a petroleum based product. Every tire created consumes around seven gallons of oil. The world creates over a billion tires annually. Around 240 million of those tires end up discarded into landfills across the country. While programs exist to recycle these tires into reusable fuel, most go to waste. Recycling these fossil fuel based products have many advantages. Not only do they preserve natural resources, but it reduces air and water pollution and carbon emissions. In 2004, the people of California recycled around 12 billion bottles and cans that saved enough energy to power 522,000 homes (Frequently Asked Questions: Benefits of Recycling). Tighter regulations and more widespread recycling programs can help the entire country recognize these types of savings in energy which in return reduces the amount of fossil fuels needed every

Related Documents