The Pros And Cons Of Fordism

Better Essays
Through the rise of modernism in American culture during the 1920’s, America’s societal and economical standards were changed. Those changes came in the form of a rise in mass consumption, fewer societal restrictions, and new opportunities created through the rise of Industrialization. In the middle of this changing culture stood Henry Ford and his automobile company. Ford helped push American culture toward a heightened emphasis on mechanization, while also revolutionizing mass production through the creation of the assembly line. Yet, both Ford and modern American culture displayed contradictions in how they affected the American people. While supplying many benefits that brought great progress to American society, they also created disadvantages. …show more content…
The Women’s Suffrage movement that created, “…a new feminine personality,” and greater African American presence in the North symbolized changing attitudes towards both groups in American society (Gramsci 282). However, the fact that these new social groups were gaining more influence in American society brought fear to other groups, such as white Christian males. That fear stemmed from the feeling that the power they held for so many years could eventually be stripped away from them. In regards to Fordism, it also connects with the modern American culture clash between those in power with those below. Within his business, Ford sought to keep power within his management group rather than give his workforce any leverage. Part of the inspiration for the Five-Dollar Day as an effort to subdue any possible problems the workers could have. In addition, Ford, along with Taylor, preached their systems to be meritocracies, systems where success would be reached when, “...individual[s] [have] reached [the] highest state of efficiency,” or output for the company (“The Principles of Scientific Management” 3). Yet, this statement seems flawed when the actual structure of Ford’s business is examined. In Ford’s company, all employees make up the workforce who work within a standardized, dehumanized, task-managed set of regulations created by Ford and those he hired to help him. The structure of Ford’s business resembles that of a bureaucracy, one where the upper class specifies the rules that regulate those below. Both American culture and Fordism reveal contradicting forces between the two classes in each social structure. The contradiction of the prosperity of lower classes and the force of those above to keep them down presents itself both in Fordism and modern American

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Civil Rights Act Of 1964

    • 1118 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Also, more people were immigrating to America. Many white Americans thought that American culture would not be able to work with so many different cultures, and disagreed with immigrants who didn’t try to assimilate. There were more conflicts between individual liberties and morality. This debate between rights and religion turned to abortion. Pro-choice advocates argued that allowing abortion would address gender inequalities, while abortion opponents thought that motherhood was a woman’s most important job.…

    • 1118 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It overcame the monarchy system to become a diplomatic republic with the people having a voice in what they want for this great nation. The creation of the checks and balance system of the three branches of government helps to ensure that no one person will have absolute control over the nation again. The change in the social system from only a select few dictating what was best for the country changed after the market revolution which moved more people into the work force and created a different social system for people to strive toward. Laws were changed to allow more whites the opportunity to vote, which will continue to change over the next decade also. There was still discrimination toward women and blacks during this time but there were discussions being held by the elite wives to attempt to change the perception of women especially.…

    • 1406 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These positive financial statement figures were an indication of Ford’s strong market and financial positions. Its main competition till 1970’s was with General Motors and Chrysler. However, with the entry of Japanese companies like Honda, Toyota, and Nissan the firm faced stiffer competition with the auto market being over-capacitated. In order to take advantage of their global presence and deal with the increasing global competition, Ford along with General Motors and Chrysler saw an urgent need to consolidate their industry and started merging with other automakers around the globe. Such swift action had enabled these giant firms to achieve better quality products at a reduced cycle time and lower costs due to the economies of…

    • 1680 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Evidently, laws and regulations are created in order to improve our society and promote social equality. However, the current legality of the United States Immigration system is too vague and internally contradictory. This is the root cause that has created many negative effects on the economy and society in the country. In addition, Many Americans think laws are just and can be understood by a process of objective reasoning. This is not entirely true as suggests by Chomsky, “They change over time, and they are often created and modified to serve the interests of some groups–generally the powerful and privileged–over others” (1).…

    • 1110 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    America’s industrial expansion in the late nineteenth century was part of a new economy for the country and the rapid urbanization. Many conditions and factors were part of a remarkable growth and the industrial supremacy. Since nineteenth century the industry built a manufacturing economy and a growing size of cities becoming an urban nation. However, the rapid urbanization, the respond of the government, and the accelerated industrialization transformed the society and the culture. Did the industrialization bring progress and pain to late nineteenth century America and help to develop a new economic order to the country?…

    • 796 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As a nation we came together and saw that an increase in the population would stimulate wealth and industrial production. The demand for more of our countries resources was overlooked when faced with multiple civilizations migrating from their mother land to America. Exploiting the other countries by enslaving them, infecting them with diseases, and tearing from their traditions, The United States abruptly expanded without knowing the consequences. There are many pros and cons surrounding the United states Imperialism, however the reasons why America Imperialize was to use the markets in order to make trading more efficient, to increase the military strength, and to show cultural…

    • 1968 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    While it is true many steps and innovations were made to unify and improve the United States, the railroad system and telegraph for instance, they were counteracted by the negative results of the time period. Abolition and nativism were two of the key obstacles to nationalism at the time and resulted in the United States becoming more separate in a time where they were attempting to unite. Throughout United States history, small disputes can be found slowing the overall progress. This issue is found today, as the two main parties have several issues they cannot seem to find a common ground on, and most likely will remain present for the immediate future. While issues that divide the nation are constantly found, the separation from 1800 to 1848 can be viewed as one of the larger ones due to the fact that the country became socially and economically different in many…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    1920s Social Changes

    • 1424 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The era following World War I known as the roaring twenties displayed a clash of traditional ideas and modernized ideas, both how these issues grew and their eventual outcomes. These issues manifested various social changes dealing with new immigration, religious tradition, the exploitation of mass media and new inventions, and the social tension with women, blacks, and gangs. The new flow of immigrants was restricted and controlled due to the hysteria induced by the Red Scare with liberals challenging the nativists. The traditional fundamentalism in religion challenged modern values with the Ku Klux Klan, the Scopes trials, and exploring religion in the United States. The mass media of the decade contributed to the growth of affordable consumer…

    • 1424 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Factories began the shift from hand to hand work to more of a repetitive work style in order to speed up production which was referred to as the Factory system. This shift is what helped society transition to a more industrialized way of life: “The dynamism of the economy shifted firmly from agriculture to industry and trade. Some regions, notably coalfield areas, rapidly industrialized…” (bbc.co.uk) This quote also discusses the economic change brought by the factories of the Industrial Revolution, as the markets adjusted. Another result of these factories was the creation of urbanization in major cities which refers…

    • 1479 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This is because, as Friedman says, an executive should be selected based on his ability to run a business, and not based on his knowledge on how to battle social issues like inflation (Friedman, 4). An executive who attempts to solve a problem they are not knowledgeable of, is running the risk of making matters worse. Additionally, there is no way for an executive to know how much of the company’s resources can be justifiably allocated towards general social interest. Should an executive stop at 5% revenue like Mackey, or should they be putting aside more or less of their resources? Again, there is no way for an average executive to know this.…

    • 1021 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays