Federal Court Case Study

Claire is in tenth grade and lives at home with her single mother and two sisters. Her mother works long shifts, takes care of her children, and tries her best to help them be satisfactory students. However, her children are absent from school several days for many different reasons. She has received a few phone calls from the school and each time she provides them with some reason as to why her kids have not been attending school. Unaware of the serious consequences, she keeps the kids home from school once again. This time, she is relieved that the school has not called her. Little does she know, a letter is on the way to her house that will prove she has taken things too far. The children are now considered truant and the mother is being …show more content…
Today, cases are only able to begin in the federal court system “when they fit into one of the three categories: (1) the lawsuit requires interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, a federal law, or a treaty of the United States; (2) the federal government is suing or prosecuting someone or is itself being sued; or (3) the lawsuit is between two citizens of different states suing for an amount of more than $75,000” (Dautrich). The judges present for such rulings, unlike state court judges, are chosen by the President and then must be approved by the Senate. There are many levels of courts in the federal Judiciary, such as the district and appellate courts that are placed under the Supreme …show more content…
Madison was crucial in strengthening the power of the Supreme Court. This issue began when former president John Adams tried to make last minute appointments to the Supreme Court during his lame duck presidency. This became known as the Judiciary Act of 1789. Right before Thomas Jefferson assumed his role as president, Adams appointed William Marbury to the court. Jefferson refused to recognize Adams’ appointments to the court, and would not let Marbury assume the position he had been granted. James Madison, the secretary of state under Jefferson, was informed to withhold the jobs to the newly appointed members. Out of disbelief and anger, Marbury then decided to sue James Madison. The case went to the Supreme Court. “This was the first time the Supreme Court struck down a law because it was unconstitutional” (“Marbury”). This case most importantly established the principle of judicial review. Judicial review simply stated that the Supreme Court was allowed to decide the constitutionality of

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