The Pros And Cons Of Electronic Cigarettes

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Electronic Cigarettes are not a safer alternative to combustible cigarettes or other tobacco products, instead they are a new way for nicotine addiction. A British agency found “the value of electronic cigarettes in helping people to quit smoking” and even reports that “e-cigarettes can reduce the health risks of smoking by 95 percent because they deliver nicotine to satisfy an addiction, but far fewer harmful chemicals than regular cigarettes” (The New York Times Editorial Board, 2015). On the other hand, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found, through a longitudinal study in Los Angeles, California, that “among high school students…who had ever used e-cigarettes” were more common than using “combustible tobacco…over …show more content…
Once a person is addicted to nicotine, it is hard to get rid of (even with the help of nicotine patch, gum, or prescription medicine.) According to Centers of Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2010 National Health Interview Survey data, only 6.2% of smokers quit within a year. According to a 2013 study, when compared with traditional methods for smoking cessation, e- cigarettes did not prove to be more effective- only 7.3% of the study group were able to quit smoking using nicotine e-cigarettes and 4.1% of the group were able to quit smoking using placebo cigarettes without nicotine (Bullen, et al. 2013). This raises the question whether e-cigarettes is giving birth to a new kind of addiction and if we can utilize non-nicotine e-cigarettes instead just as a harm reducing smoking cessation tool (which would not attract current non-smokers to start smoking …show more content…
E-cigarettes contain propylene oxide and formaldehyde- both of which are known to cause “inflammatory lesions of the nasal cavity, trachea, and lungs” and other pulmonary toxicity- as a result, lung cancer and other cardiovascular diseases may be developed over time (Bhatnagar, et al. 2014). In a study that “measured indoor pollution from 3 people using e-cigarettes over a 2-hour period” in a café, found “elevated nicotine, propanediol, glycerin, aluminum, and 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons classified as probable carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer in the room air.” (Schobar, et al. 2014). Another study found that heavy metals, like Tin, in samples of e-cigarette liquids, which are cytotoxic to human pulmonary fibroblasts. E-cigarette aerosol also contains nickel, in a “2 to 100 times higher than found in Marlboro cigarette smoke.” These metal nanoparticles that come from the smoking device “can deposit into alveolar sacs in the lungs, potentially causing local respiratory toxicity and entering the bloodstream” (Williams, et al. 2013). Keeping these consequences in mind, the ingredients put in e-cigarettes need to be regulated by the

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