Incarceration And Poverty: An Analysis Of The Criminal Justice System

1310 Words 6 Pages
When someone becomes incarcerated and categorized as a criminal, it has many effect not only on the person but the people around them too. Criminals should be punished for their crimes, however, the severe treatment they are put through as well as the family they can no longer support from behind bars adds more problems. The illegal decisions that have been made lead to financial problems, family issues, and makes it harder to adjust back into the real world once their time is served. Criminals are also treated differently by race in the prison system, this leads to even worse problems for African Americans and other groups based on the way they are treated while locked up. The interconnection of social problems with race, punishment, and poverty …show more content…
Being put behind bars and being taken out of society puts these people at disadvantages including poverty. When entering a criminal sanction, people leave behind everything they have and do not make income while in they are in the sanction. When the person gets out they usually have nowhere to go and no one to rely on. Not only does incarceration lead to poverty, but poverty is also a trait in these criminals. “Poverty may have direct effects on crime if the inability to secure steady or sufficient financial resources leads individuals to turn to illicit activity to generate income or if relative poverty in the midst of a wealthy society generates psychological strain” (Sharkey P., Besbris M., and Firedson M., 2016). People who live in poverty are at a strong disadvantage than those who are well off. Sometimes when people cannot afford to have much it drives them to do what they must just to get it. …show more content…
People who are convicted lose many of their rights as a civilian both in and out of prison. These restrictions apply to the categories of occupational, public aid and civic. When it comes to occupational disadvantages, many people are required to check a box if they are a felon or not. This leads to employers turning them down and making it very hard for them to get a job somewhere other than a fast food joint. Next, more than 124,000 students have been rejected or lost their financial aid since the provision’s enactment of 1998. Tens of thousands of people have been denied their Pell Grants to attend college. This also leads to the racial inequality since more racial and ethnic minorities are convicted of these disqualifying convictions (Wheelock and Uggen, 2006). Lastly, felons experience a range of civic inequalities. Some civic restrictions include felon disenfranchisement, jury exclusion, and disqualification for public office. Also, non-citizens face the consequence of deportation back to their original country (Wheelock and Uggen, 2006). It is hard for a felon to become a fully function member of society with these disadvantages that they

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