The Pros And Cons Of Cochlear Implants

1450 Words 6 Pages
In recent years, numerous technological advances have come forth in an attempt to resolve or dampen the effects of different sensory impairments. Since around the intermediate years of the 1900s, one invention in particular has been designed, revised, and debated over with the purpose of aiding individuals who suffer complete and various partial forms of hearing loss. Hearing loss involves cochlear malfunction, and the cochlea is the primary hearing organ in the inner ear. Over the past few decades, the cochlear implant has been tested and revamped in order to adapt to the various discoveries of deafness in humans. While cochlear implants may appear to be a complete solution for those who suffer from complete or partial hearing loss, one …show more content…
The hearing community feels that any improvement in hearing should be a win for members of the deaf community, as such an advance would provide a deaf individual with some level of hearing that he or she did not have before. Furthermore, the hearing community is particularly concerned with situations involving deaf children. Deaf children may be born to deaf parents or hearing parents, but the situation is sensitive regarding who should be able to make a decision that could completely alter or hinder a child’s future. The hearing community feels that deaf children should be able to take advantage of any opportunity to be able to hear, as this may allow them to assimilate into regular schools and various activities. In fact, the hearing community feels that a parent should not be allowed to hinder a deaf child from accepting a complete fix in hearing. Moreover, it appears that the hearing community feels that the cochlear implant is a complete resolution for deaf individuals. It seems as though the hearing community looks at the big picture rather than the tiny details, and the deaf community takes into consideration the parts that the hearing community fails to …show more content…
First and foremost, these deaf patients should go through extensive hearing tests and brain scans to register what about the cochlea is not functioning normally. Secondly, these patients should be evaluated based on their level of deafness and age. Children should definitely have first priority to these devices to ensure advancement with their development, but if the cochlear implant will not provide much of a difference in hearing, then the consequences of the technology should be explored. If a patient does receive a cochlear implant, then he or she should be evaluated following device implantation for potential hearing loss or gain. As far as how many hearing-impaired individuals should receive a cochlear implant, the previous criteria would determine which individuals would obtain the device. The cochlear implant certainly should not be used in every hearing-impaired patient, because it may not change their hearing dramatically enough to make a difference. As of now, the cochlear implant should be used on a trial basis in certain hearing-impaired patients.

Related Documents