The Pros And Cons Of Celiac Disease

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In contrast from 20 years ago, celiac disease has become more prevalent than ever before. When one consumes food containing the protein gluten, the small intestine reacts by preventing vitamins and minerals to absorb. Gluten peptides are perceived as foreigners by antibodies within the body. Therefore, these antibodies treat them as a threat, and begin to destroy the intestinal wall called the epithelium and beyond the small intestine. Resolving the problem essentially requires a strict gluten-free diet which should end all symptoms and restore the ruined tissue within two years. Due to Celiac Disease’s increased prevalence, many food products have become readily available so that gluten can be reasonably avoided. By this means, the condition …show more content…
According to a researcher, in Celiac disease, when someone consumes food containing the protein gluten, the small intestine reacts by preventing vitamins and minerals to absorb (Niewinski M. M., Advances in Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet, 2008). The compounds within gluten called peptides are perceived as foreigners by antibodies within the body. Therefore, these antibodies treat them as an “invading” threat, and begin to destroy the intestinal tissue and its wall called the epithelium. As the combat progresses, targeted destruction extends to the organ’s exterior. Consequently, complications outside the small intestine ensue which serve as the reason why Celiac disease (CD) victims experience symptoms excluding intestinal involvement. Some of the symptoms that affect additional organs and tissue, include iron-deficiency anemia, chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, dyspepsia, infertility, pubertal delay, arthralgia, aphthous stomatitis, folate/zinc deficiency, (Niewinski M. M., Advances in Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet, 2008). But, these symptoms occur in a limited group of people. Furthermore, those susceptible to develop the disease include first degree relatives of diagnosed patient, Down Syndrome patients, and those diagnosed with other autoimmune diseases (Niewinski M. M., Advances in Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free Diet, 2008). Interestingly, CD …show more content…
But, when patients heed counsel from a specialist in the field, their motivation to change their diets increases considerably. Significantly adjusting one’s diet can pose as a challenge; yet, the researcher stresses for patients to take advantage of gluten-free products that are manufactured in plenty. Taking advantage of these products essentially makes the transition smoother. In addition, certain vitamins and minerals should be replenished to restore the losses due to malabsorption. To properly manage the diet, patients should participate in support groups where they can receive ongoing accountability. Lastly, having consistent follow-up appointments with a practitioner encourages patients to stay up-to-date with the current disposition of their

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