The Pros And Cons Of Canadian Peacekeeping

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This was devastating to the Canadian public yet also humiliating. It was viewed more a tragedy as Canada’s legacy with the United Nations, including the Security Council, had been built up for generations. Now, it is viewed as “almost lost” (Partsinevelos, 2012). However, the upsetting moment for several was the reveal of the lack of votes received. Many Canadians have a specific view of how we are seen on the international scale, and with the results of this election, Canadian citizens now had to face the reality of how we are now perceived and the “decline in our world standing” (Cheng, 2010). Previous Canadian peacekeeping values are viewed as a perception left behind in the past and the anger brought upon Portugal’s victory reminded us of this notion (Cheng, 2010). …show more content…
Peacekeeping is proven to be one of the most effective tools in assisting countries in inter and intra conflicts, yet appointing these missions are not an easy task (UN Peacekeeping, 2015). With such a role comes great responsibility. The Security Council adopts resolutions and decides the mission’s mandate while deploying peacekeepers where and when they are needed to help states transition from conflict to peace (UN Peacekeeping, 2015). This position helps enforcement decisions on large international issues, and they are also effective in assisting countries in inter and intra conflicts (UN Peacekeeping, 2015). It is essential that all member states of the United Nations elect non-permanent members to the Security Council who will reflect the peacekeeping values that the UN projects in order to protect the livelihoods of citizens across the globe from crimes against humanity

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