The Pros And Cons Of Assimilation

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Assimilation is the cultural changes in a displaced person that takes place because of time spent in an dissimilar culture. Berry, Poortinga, Segall, and Dasen (2002) mention that there are distinctions between psychosomatic and socio-cultural assimilation. At the personal stage, adaptation happens in a student 's identity, principles, and viewpoints. They often experience stress from seeking to fit into a new group of peers who speak dissimilar languages. Trying to adapt to a new culture, language and customs is a breeding ground that leads to trepidation or hopelessness, as they try to adapt to a new way of thinking and living. Stein (1979) recommended that educational accomplishment is indispensable for refugee children’s assimilation into …show more content…
Though there are cultures that find it easier to become one with their new environment, families and children from Middle Eastern Asian cultures and especially from Far Eastern Asian nations find it excruciatingly hard to assimilate and to become comfortable in alternative lifestyles they find themselves in during times of conflict in their own lands. This is no less difficult for children as they seek to study with children around them they do not know. Yet, but studying and meet the same children day by day, they learn to communicate in unique ways and eventually friendships and relationships develop that are vital to their psychological and emotional wellbeing. Ogbu (1982) illuminates this idea in stating that acclimating to a new society influences whether a person is an intentional immigrant or an involuntary immigrant such as children and their families that are torn away from the land of their birth due to natural disasters or man-mad catastrophes like war and terrorism. Ogbu (1982, p. 201) portrayed refugees as involuntary immigrants that have no other options but to flee and to find safety in a land other than their …show more content…
Many of those who fund relief operations regard education as an extravagance when compared to such crucial needs of water, food, and refuge. Sinclair evaluated information of psychological distress in young children and determined that early childhood education sustains emotional and communal development and assists in providing a feeling of normalcy and trust. An appraisal by Sinclair (2001) of the Rapid Response Education Program designed to aid children from Freetown, Sierra Leone 's outbreak of hostility in 1999 showed that only two weeks after the program was initiated, children experienced a far more rapid amount of adjustment to their plight. Students reported an 8% reduction of the dark memories of distressing actions they had witnessed before taking flight from their homelands. Children were reported to have 49 % fewer sleeping difficulties as a result of the continuity of Education that was implemented. This result is a solid example that proves that continued education in conflict does have a very important role to play in preserving children 's future and will eventually greatly aid in reconciliation and

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