The Pros And Cons Of Affirmative Action In Education

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To fully understand the problems revolving around race-based admission programs in various universities, one must first understand how this issue first developed, as well as what affirmative action is. Affirmative action is a policy also known as positive discrimination, in other words, it strives to favor people who are a minority, such as, people of color. This is an important issue as it affects legislators, colleges, but most importantly future college students. For this issue, there are those that are for and against affirmative action; as well as those who seek a compromise, like the Top Ten percent plan in Texas. The earliest case dealing with race in the educational field dates back the early 1900’s with the Berea College v. Kentucky …show more content…
Bakke 1978 case is about the use of a racial quota at the University of California. The case deals with a white male, of Allan Bakke, who was denied acceptance into the university, twice, despite having better scores and grades than the vast majority of minority students who were accepted (Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., “Bakke decision”). This was caused by the university’s use of a racial quota; this quota reserved “16 of 100 places in each year’s entering class for racial minorities” (Gruhi, “The Impact of the Bakke Decision”). Ultimately, the court ruled that “schools cannot use quotas but can practice affirmative action” (Gruhi, “The Impact of the Bakke Decision”), thus starting all the issues revolving around the factor that race should play in the admission …show more content…
This compromise falls between future students, legislators, and universities who found common ground between both race-conscious policies such as affirmative action and race-blind policies (The Texas Tribune, “Top 10 Percent Rule”). The Top Ten percent plan allows “all Texas high school students who finished in the top 10 percent of their graduating class to be guaranteed admission at any public university in the state” (The Texas Tribune, “Top 10 Percent Rule”) which usually fills up about 70 to 80 percent of public universities incoming classes. This contributes to the first part of the

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